Car insurance rates by state for 2021

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Several factors impact your car insurance premium, including your driving history, age and vehicle type. One variable that affects your auto insurance rates quite significantly is where you live, even in states where ZIP codes cannot be used as a factor in determining your rates. Each state approaches auto insurance laws differently, and these differing laws affect the cost of car insurance. Car insurance rates by state can vary a lot, often by hundreds or even thousands of dollars.

Bankrate has gathered average 2021 car insurance premiums from Quadrant Information Services and researched the insurance requirements for each state to give you all the information you need about your state as you get started in your insurance shopping journey.

Car insurance rates by state

Being aware of your state’s insurance laws can help you understand how claims will be handled. While you may find it helpful to know your state’s minimum car insurance limits, there’s no need to memorize them, because you will not be able to purchase a car insurance policy with limits lower than your state’s minimum.

The table below lists the average car insurance rates in each state for both the state’s minimum coverage levels and full coverage car insurance, which includes comprehensive and collision coverage. Each state’s minimum liability car insurance limits are listed as three numbers separated by a slash, indicating the state’s liability coverage requirements for: bodily injury per person/bodily injury per accident/property damage per accident.

State Minimum liability coverage requirements (in thousands) Average annual cost of minimum coverage Average annual cost of full coverage
Alabama 25/50/25 $469 $1,623
Alaska 50/100/25 $373 $1,559
Arizona 25/50/15 $555 $1,547
Arkansas 25/50/25 $470 $1,914
California 15/30/5 $733 $2,065
Colorado 25/50/15 $518 $2,016
Connecticut 25/50/25 $794 $1,845
Delaware 25/50/10 $787 $1,775
Florida 40471 $1,101 $2,364
Georgia 25/50/25 $756 $1,982
Hawaii 20/40/10 $354 $1,127
Idaho 25/50/15 $307 $1,045
Illinois 25/50/20 $442 $1,485
Indiana 25/50/25 $367 $1,254
Iowa 20/40/15 $252 $1,260
Kansas 25/50/25 $410 $1,698
Kentucky 25/50/25 $748 $2,128
Louisiana 15/30/25 $975 $2,724
Maine 50/100/25 $294 965
Maryland 30/60/15 $767 $1,877
Massachusetts 20/40/5 $510 $1,223
Michigan 50/100/10 $948 $2,309
Minnesota 30/60/10 $537 $1,643
Mississippi 25/50/25 $492 $1,782
Missouri 25/50/25 $468 $1,661
Montana 25/50/20 $342 $1,737
Nebraska 25/50/25 $335 $1,531
Nevada 25/50/20 $860 $2,245
New Hampshire 25/50/25 $389 $1,275
New Jersey 15/30/5 $847 $1,757
New Mexico 25/50/10 $385 $1,419
New York 25/50/10 $1,062 $2,321
North Carolina 30/60/25 $413 $1,325
North Dakota 25/50/25 $285 $1,264
Ohio 25/50/25 $328 $1,034
Oklahoma 25/50/25 $423 $1,873
Oregon 25/50/20 $610 $1,346
Pennsylvania 15/30/5 $427 $1,476
Rhode Island 25/50/25 $749 $2,018
South Carolina 25/50/25 $558 $1,512
South Dakota 25/50/25 $275 $1,642
Tennessee 25/50/15 $371 $1,338
$Texas 30/60/25 $524 $1,823
$Utah 25/65/15 $528 $1,306
$Vermont 25/50/10 $292 $1,207
$Virginia 25/50/20 $441 $1,304
Washington 25/50/10 $463 $1,176
Washington, D.C. 25/50/10 $704 $1,855
West Virginia 25/50/25 $458 $1,499
Wisconsin 25/50/10 $332 $1,186
Wyoming 25/50/20 $271 $1,495

 

Alabama

Alabama car insurance costs around the same as the national average. The state’s highway system ranks in the middle of the pack at nineteenth, according to the Reason Foundation’s Annual Highway Report. While Alabama is one of the most dangerous states for extreme weather and crime, its low cost of living helps to moderate car insurance costs.

Alaska

Alaska drivers pay slightly less for their auto insurance on average than the typical American driver. On average, drivers in Alaska spent only 7.2 hours in congestion in 2019 – the fifth-least of any U.S. state. While Alaska is known for having sub-par infrastructure, its low cost of living and low population density help keep car insurance costs relatively low.

Arizona

Arizona drivers typically pay around $100 less per year for full coverage auto insurance than the national average. Arizona’s roadways rank middle-of-the-road, and the state’s cost of living is average. Arizona drivers spend an average of 30.1 hours in traffic due to congestion, which is about average for the U.S. Together, these factors likely contribute to Arizona’s car insurance rates being on par with the national average.

Arkansas

Average Arkansas full coverage car insurance rates are $240 more per year than the national average, which could be due, in part, to Arkansas ranking fourth for the highest crime rate in the country, according to USA Today. In addition, the Natural State ranks fifth for states with worst weather. One factor that may be preventing Arkansas car insurance levels from skyrocketing is that the state has the second-lowest cost of living.

California

Full coverage car insurance in California typically costs $418 more per year than the national average. High insurance costs in the Golden State could be due to California’s sky-high cost of living and the state’s low-ranking infrastructure. In addition, two of the four metropolitan areas with the worst congestion are located in California, according to a USA Today analysis.

Colorado

Colorado’s full coverage car insurance rates are, on average, $342 higher per year than the rest of the country. High insurance costs in the state could be related to the state’s poor road conditions. In addition, Coloradans spend an average of 37 hours in congestion per year, which is six hours more than the national average.

Connecticut

Car insurance in Connecticut costs $171 more per year for full coverage than the rest of the country, on average. Connecticut ranks in the top five states with the highest population density. In addition, Connecticut drivers spend an average of 38 hours per year in urbanized area traffic congestion. While the state has a low crime rate, Connecticut has the eighth-highest cost of living in the country, which contributes to high insurance rates.

Delaware

Delaware’s average annual full coverage car insurance rates are $100 more than the national average. Delaware drivers spend over 100 hours in urbanized traffic congestion per year – the most of any state. The cost of living in Delaware is also slightly higher than the national average cost of living. Delaware also has the sixth-highest population density of any state. Together, these characteristics contribute to the higher cost of insurance.

Florida

Florida has one of the highest average annual full coverage car insurance rates in the country, clocking in at $690 higher than the national average. High premiums could be due to diverse factors in this region. For instance, Floridians spend 40.4 hours in congestion per year, which is around 10 hours more than average. Florida also ranks eighth in highest population density, which can contribute to crowded roads and accidents, according to Statista. The state also ranks third for the most deadly car accidents.

Georgia

Georgia full coverage car insurance costs about $308 more than the national average per year. High car insurance rates in Georgia could be due in part to the poor condition of infrastructure in the state. Georgians also spend 42 hours in urbanized area traffic per year, which is around 10 hours more than average and can lead to traffic accidents. Georgia has the fourth most fatal car accidents of any state, according to World Population Review.

Hawaii

Despite Hawaii having the highest cost of living of any state, car insurance in the state is relatively cheap. Full coverage car insurance in the Aloha State costs $547 less than the national average per year. Hawaiian drivers spend the fourth-fewest hours in urbanized area commuter traffic per year, according to a Reason Foundation study. Honolulu, Hawaii is also known for its efficient public transit system, which allows residents to travel without using their cars. Hawaii also has fewer licensed drivers than 42 other states, according to Statista, which could contribute to lower car insurance rates.

Idaho

Idaho’s average annual full coverage car insurance rates are some of the cheapest in the country, coming in $629 cheaper than the national average. Car insurance rates in Idaho remain low due to the state’s low population density, low number of licensed drivers and highly-ranked infrastructure. Of any state in the U.S., Idaho drivers also spend the fewest hours in urbanized traffic congestion, which could contribute to low car insurance rates.

Illinois

Illinois drivers pay $189 less per year for full coverage car insurance than the national average. Illinois sits in the middle of the pack when it comes to cost of living and crime rate. Illinois residents may save on their car insurance due to the state ranking tenth in best public transportation.

Indiana

Indiana drivers pay an average of $420 less per year than the national average for full coverage car insurance. Indiana residents may pay less for their car insurance due to the state’s low cost of living. Indiana ranks above average in urban highway fatality rate and urban pavement condition, according to a Reason Foundation study.

Iowa

In Iowa, drivers spend an average of $414 less per year for full coverage insurance than the national average. Low vehicle maintenance costs, a low cost of living and low population density may contribute to low insurance costs. In addition, Iowa drivers spend less time in traffic on their commute than drivers in 48 other states, which may help reduce insurance costs.

Kansas

Kansas drivers pay only $24 more per year than the national annual average for full coverage car insurance. The state ranks in the middle of the pack for fatality rate, population density and number of licensed drivers – which may be why the state’s average rate for car insurance is so close to the national average.

Kentucky

Kentucky drivers typically spend $454 more per year on their full coverage car insurance than the national average. High car insurance rates in the Bluegrass State may be high due to exceptionally high fatality rates on state roadways in addition to a high crime rate.

Louisiana

Louisiana’s average annual full coverage car insurance rates are sky-high, coming in at $1,050 higher than the national average. Car insurance in Louisiana may be expensive because of the state’s high crime rate, high fatality rate on state roadways, high number of hours spent in urbanized congestion per commuter and dangerous weather patterns.

Maine

Full coverage car insurance in Maine costs around $700 less per year than the national average. Cheap car insurance in the Pine Tree State may be due to the state’s low population density, low fatality rate on state roadways, low number of licensed drivers and low cost of living.

Maryland

In general, Maryland drivers pay $203 more per year than the national average for their full coverage car insurance. Maryland residents may pay more due to the high rate of traffic congestion in urbanized areas of the state. In addition, Maryland’s infrastructure is worse than 40 other states, according to a Reason Foundation study.

Massachusetts

Despite Massachusetts’ high cost of living, structurally deficient infrastructure and high roadway fatality rate, drivers in the Bay State typically pay $451 less per year than the national average for full coverage car insurance. One reason for low insurance costs could be that Massachusetts lays claim to the eighth-best public transit system in the country, which encourages citizens to use public transportation rather than their cars.

Michigan

If you’re looking for car insurance in the Great Lakes State, you may have to pay a steep price. Michiganders generally pay $635 more per year for their full coverage car insurance than other U.S. drivers on average. Car insurance rates in Michigan may be especially high due to Michigan’s high crime rate and high fatal crash rate. The state also has more stringent car insurance coverage requirements than many other states and precludes car insurance companies from using several standard non-driving rating factors, such as credit rating and ZIP code, when calculating premiums.

Minnesota

In Minnesota, drivers typically spend around the same amount for full coverage car insurance as the national average. Since Minnesota ranks middle-of-the-road for cost of living, infrastructure quality, population density and number of licensed drivers, state car insurance rates remain average.

Mississippi

Despite having the lowest cost of living of any U.S. state, Mississippi drivers typically pay slightly more for their full coverage car insurance per year than the national average. Mississippi has the highest rate of car accident deaths per 100,000 people, which likely contributes to the state’s higher than average rates. Mississippi’s dangerous weather patterns could also partially account for the spike.

Missouri

Missouri’s average annual full coverage car insurance rates are only around $15 above the national average. These average rates are no surprise, since the state ranks in the middle of the pack when it comes to fatal crashes, population density, number of licensed drivers and hours spent sitting in traffic.

Montana

Montana residents typically pay about $63 more per year than the average American for their full coverage auto insurance. Montana ranks middle of the road in crime rate, infrastructure, cost of living and fatal car accident statistics. If you’re looking for car insurance in Montana, you’ll be required to carry at least 25/50/20 to comply with the state’s minimum liability requirements.

Nebraska

Despite Nebraska’s low cost of living and low population density, the state’s drivers pay $571 per year more on average than the rest of the country for their full coverage car insurance. Nebraska’s urban roads are in poor condition, which could contribute to high auto insurance rates in the state.

Nevada

Nevadans pay nearly $600 more per year on average for their full coverage car insurance than the average American. These high rates could be due in part to Nevada’s high cost of living and high rural highway fatality rate. In addition, Nevada ranks third in most dangerous weather patterns.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire drivers typically pay significantly less for their car insurance than the average American. Low insurance rates could be partially due to the state’s low crime rate and good rural and urban road conditions. Keep in mind that New Hampshire does not have minimum liability car insurance requirements.

New Jersey

Drivers in the Garden State sit in traffic congestion in urbanized areas for an average of 40 hours per year. This roadway congestion, paired with a high crime rate and the highest population density of any state make for higher than average car insurance premiums.

New Mexico

New Mexico drivers pay around $200 less for their full coverage car insurance per year than the national average. New Mexico has the fifth-lowest cost of living and low population density, which could both contribute to the lower-than-average cost of car insurance in the state.

New York

With the second-highest average cost for minimum coverage car insurance in the nation and the third-highest average cost for full coverage, New York drivers typically pay significantly more for car insurance than the average U.S. driver. The state’s high insurance rates are largely due to the high number of fraudulent insurance claims made each year, in addition to its over 11 million registered vehicles, causing traffic to be dense with a higher likelihood of collision.

  • North Carolina

    North Carolinians typically pay $410 less per year for their full coverage car insurance than the national average. North Carolina’s high ranking in urban road condition, mild weather and fairly low cost of living could contribute to these lower-than-average rates.

    North Dakota

    North Dakota typically drivers pay $410 less for their full coverage car insurance per year than the average American driver. North Dakota ranked first in overall highway performance and cost-effectiveness in the Reason Foundation’s highway study. The state also has one of the lowest instances of fatal crashes, lowest population densities and lowest number of licensed drivers in the United States.

    Ohio

    Despite having a large driving population and increasing likelihood of motor vehicle accidents and injury, Ohio is actually the second-cheapest state for full coverage car insurance on average, with drivers paying about $1,034 per year. The lower cost of coverage may in part be due to Ohio’s mix of rural and suburban roads, helping to break up what may otherwise be a heavy concentration of traffic, which can lead to more road risk.

    Oklahoma

    Despite Oklahoma having the second-lowest cost of living in the United States, Oklahoma drivers typically pay nearly $200 more per year for full coverage car insurance than the national average. Car insurance may be more expensive in the Sooner State due to the high crime rate, dangerous weather and high number of structurally-deficient bridges.

    Oregon

    Despite Oregon’s high cost of living, drivers in the state pay an average of $328 less per year than the national average for their full coverage car insurance. Relatively affordable insurance rates in the Beaver State could be due to the state’s low population density, mild weather and well-kept rural and urban roads.

    Pennsylvania

    Although Pennsylvania has a high rate of traffic fatalities, poor infrastructure and high population density, residents manage to pay almost $200 less per year on average for full coverage car insurance than the national average.

    Rhode Island

    Rhode Island residents pay around $344 more per year on average for full coverage car insurance than the rest of the country. The state ranks lower than 45 other states in highway performance and effectiveness. In addition, Rhode Island has a high cost of living, which may contribute to the high cost of auto insurance due to increased costs for car repair.

    South Carolina

    other U.S. drivers. South Carolina’s highly-ranked highways, low cost of living, low population density and mild weather may contribute to affordable average car insurance rates in the Palmetto State.

    South Dakota

    Drivers in the Mount Rushmore State spend around the same amount on their car insurance as the national average. South Dakota claims average rankings when it comes to crime rate, cost of living and population density – so it may be no surprise that the state’s insurance rates hover around the national average.

    Tennessee

    Tennessee drivers typically pay around $336 less per year for full coverage auto insurance than the average American. The Volunteer State ranks seventh in best highway performance and has the sixth-lowest cost of living, both factors which may contribute to the state’s relatively low cost of auto insurance.

    Texas

    Texas drivers generally pay around $149 more for full coverage car insurance per year than the national average. While the state claims average rankings in cost of living, crime rate and highway performance, Texas ranks first for most fatal car accidents, which could contribute to higher average car insurance premiums.

    Utah

    Drivers in the Beehive State pay an average of $368 less per year for full coverage car insurance than drivers in the rest of the country. Utah has a low crime rate and a low number of fatal crashes each year – both factors which may contribute to lower average auto insurance premiums in the state.

  • Vermont

    Vermont drivers pay an average of $467 less per year for full coverage auto insurance than the national average. Vermont has one of the lowest crime rates in the country, relatively few fatal crashes and a low number of licensed drivers. These factors may contribute to cheaper average car insurance costs in the state.

    Virginia

    Virginia residents spend an average of $370 less per year on full coverage car insurance than other drivers in the U.S. Virginia has one of the lowest crime rates in the country, and the Old Dominion state ranks in the middle of the pack in terms of cost of living, highway performance and population density. Keep in mind that the commonwealth does not have minimum liability insurance requirements for its citizens. Still, it’s a good idea to purchase auto insurance to protect your finances in the event of an accident.

    Washington

    Despite the state’s high cost of living, Washington residents spend almost $500 less per year on full coverage car insurance than the national average. Washington experiences relatively few fatal crashes each year compared to other states. In addition, the state has low population density and mild weather patterns, which could contribute to relatively affordable car insurance in the state.

    Washington D.C.

    The average annual cost of full coverage car insurance in Washington, D.C. is $181 more expensive than the national average for several reasons. The nation’s capital has a population density around ten times higher than any state, which contributes to congestion and potential car accidents. In addition, the District has the second-highest cost of living in the United States, which can drive up the average cost of car insurance premiums due to higher costs for car repair.

    West Virginia

    West Virginia residents typically spend $175 less per year on their full coverage car insurance than the national average. West Virginians may spend less on their car insurance due to the state’s low crime rate, low cost of living and low number of licensed drivers.

    Wisconsin

    Wisconsin drivers pay $488 less per year on average than other drivers in the U.S. for full coverage car insurance. Wisconsin has one of the lowest population densities in the country, at just six people per square mile. The state also has a low crime rate and a low cost of living. Together, these factors may account for the lower-than-average premiums in the Badger State.

    Wyoming

    In general, Wyoming drivers pay $179 less per year than the national average for full coverage car insurance. Wyoming has a low crime rate, little traffic congestion, a low cost of living and a low population density – all factors which may contribute to lower average car insurance premiums in the state.

    No-fault states

    Another factor impacting your car insurance rate is how your state handles car insurance in relation to car accidents. Some states are considered no-fault states, while others are at-fault states, or tort states. Contrary to what some believe, living in a no-fault state does not mean that no one is considered at fault in an accident. No-fault simply refers to how your or the other driver’s car insurance kicks in when there is an accident, specifically related to medical expenses. Below is a list of the 12 no-fault states:

    • Florida
    • Hawaii
    • Kansas
    • Kentucky
    • Massachusetts
    • Michigan
    • Minnesota
    • New Jersey
    • New York
    • North Dakota
    • Pennsylvania
    • Utah

    In a no-fault state, each party must first file a claim with their own car insurance to help cover any medical expenses after an accident, regardless of who caused the crash. Drivers in a no-fault state are typically required to carry a certain amount of Personal Injury Protection (PIP) to help cover these medical costs.

    No-fault states can still determine liability after an accident and the responsible party could be liable for property damage and medical expenses that exceed a certain threshold, depending on the state. In at-fault or tort states, the driver responsible for the crash (or their car insurance company) compensates the other driver for their losses, including bodily injury and property damage, and the not-at-fault driver is not required to file a claim for their medical expenses with their own auto insurer.

    PIP coverage does not include coverage for property damage. While no-fault states typically require that drivers carry a certain level of PIP coverage to help pay for their medical expenses, the same does not usually apply for property damage. Instead, property damage from a car accident in most no-fault states is handled similarly to property damage in at-fault states, where the at-fault driver’s insurance is responsible for covering any property damage. Michigan is the exception, as its department of insurance requires drivers to carry property protection insurance with a coverage limit of $1 million dollars to cover any property damaged by a driver in a car accident.

    Frequently asked questions

     

    Methodology

    Bankrate utilizes Quadrant Information Services to analyze 2021 rates for all ZIP codes and carriers in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. Quoted rates are based on a 40-year-old male and female driver with a clean driving record, good credit and the following full coverage limits:

    • $100,000 bodily injury liability per person
    • $300,000 bodily injury liability per accident
    • $50,000 property damage liability per accident
    • $100,000 uninsured motorist bodily injury per person
    • $300,000 uninsured motorist bodily injury per accident
    • $500 collision deductible
    • $500 comprehensive deductible

    To determine minimum coverage limits, Bankrate used minimum coverages that meet each state’s requirements. Our sample drivers own a 2019 Toyota Camry, commute five days a week and drive 12,000 miles annually.
    These are sample rates and should be used for comparative purposes only. Your quotes may be different.

    Written by
    Lizzie Nealon
    Insurance Writer
    Lizzie Nealon is an insurance writer for Bankrate. Her favorite part of the job is making home, auto and life insurance digestible for readers so they can prepare for the future.
    Edited by
    Insurance Editor