Skip to Main Content

How a speeding ticket impacts your insurance in Virginia

Speed limit
joSon/Getty Images
Bankrate Logo

Why you can trust Bankrate

While we adhere to strict , this post may contain references to products from our partners. Here's an explanation for . This content is powered by HomeInsurance.com (NPN: 8781838). For more information, please see our

According to a 2019 Department of Motor Vehicles report, over 319,000 speeding tickets were issued in Virginia. Although this is a decrease from the previous year, speeding still contributed to over 24,000 vehicle crashes in the same year. Not only does speeding pose a risk to other drivers, but the driver in violation also faces serious fines and penalties when issued a speeding ticket. A speeding ticket increases the average cost of car insurance in Virginia by 23%, according to Bankrate’s 2021 study of quoted annual premiums for 40-year-old drivers.

How much is a speeding ticket in Virginia?

The cost of a speeding ticket in Virginia depends on how much over the speeding limit you were determined to be driving. The state fine for speeding is calculated at $6 per mph over the limit. Virginia also adds a $51 processing fee per ticket. A speeding ticket for someone driving ten miles per hour over the limit would cost $60, plus the $51, for a total of about $111. The fines increase to $7 per mile if speeding occurs in a school, construction or residential zone.

How much does a speeding ticket increase your car insurance in Virginia?

A speeding ticket in Virginia will typically have a financial impact on your insurance premiums, as well. This chart shows how much of an increase you might expect, depending on your age and gender, with the average increase being around 23%. These increases are determined by reviewing quoted annual full coverage premiums with and without factoring for a speeding ticket.

Driver age Average annual full coverage premium before speeding ticket Average annual full coverage premium after speeding ticket % increase
40-year-old male $1,648 $2,073 26%
40-year-old female $1,701 $2,051 21%
Average $1,674 $2,062 23%

Females and adult drivers typically pay less in premiums compared to male or inexperienced drivers, including when receiving a speeding ticket.

How to lower your car insurance after a speeding ticket in Virginia

A speeding ticket in Virginia may increase your insurance rates, but Virginians still have options available to lower the average cost of car insurance. Here are a few ways you may be able to obtain affordable rates for the coverage you need, even with infractions in your driving history.

Get quotes from other car insurance companies

To obtain the lowest rate on premiums, experts recommend you compare quotes from at least three insurers. This will help you determine which rates are most favorable to your circumstances, especially with a speeding ticket taken into account. To help see how it may be worthwhile to switch to a new carrier versus staying with your current insurer, the table below shows how much rates may vary by provider.

Car insurance company Average annual full coverage premium before speeding ticket Average annual full coverage premium after speeding ticket % increase
Alfa $2,085 $2,253 8%
Allstate $1,921 $2,519 31%
Cincinnati Insurance $1,472 $1,922 31%
Donegal $1,453 $2,096 44%
Electric Insurance Company $2,491 $2,985 20%
Erie $1,233 $1,283 4%
Geico $1,405 $1,734 23%
Kemper $2,928 $3,370 15%
Mercury $1,558 $1,933 24%
Nationwide $1,485 $1,734 17%
Progressive $1,509 $1,826 21%
State Farm $1,457 $1,590 9%
Travelers $1,325 $2,119 60%
USAA $1,225 $1,463 19%
Virginia Farm Bureau $939 $1,092 16%

*Premiums are average annual full coverage premiums for 40-year-old male and female drivers

When shopping for new coverage, insurance costs may not be the most important attribute to you. While cost is important for many drivers, other aspects that can impact your insurance experience include the insurance company’s customer service and financial strength ratings, plus how easy it is to use its app or website for on-the-go policy management.

Shop for discounts

When comparison-shopping for insurance, another way to save money is to review all available discounts offered by the providers. Some discounts are significant, such as the multi-vehicle discount from Geico, which saves up to 25% on premiums. Even if you decide to stay with your current provider, be sure to review all current discounts offered since you may qualify for new ones based on your ongoing loyalty to the company or changing life circumstances.

Increase your deductibles

If you carry comprehensive and collision coverage, your premiums will reflect the higher degree of financial protection, as well as how much financial responsibility you assume – the amount of your deductible. If you are willing to shoulder higher out-of-pocket costs in the event of a loss, your insurer faces less financial risk, and your rates will typically be lower as a result of your higher deductibles. Some coverage types have separate deductibles. The impact on your rates can vary for each; speak with a licensed insurance agent to determine the most beneficial arrangement for your situation and finances.

Other speeding ticket considerations

In addition to the fines and processing fees for speeding tickets, Virginia uses a demerit point system. After a certain number of points are placed on your record, your license may be suspended. Each speeding violation results in four points and will stay on your record for five years.

Points and fines are associated with each ticket, but you may also face court costs and defensive driving class fees with a speeding ticket conviction.

Frequently asked questions

What is the best car insurance company for drivers with speeding tickets?

To find the best car insurance company for your situation, experts recommend comparing quotes from at least three insurers who offer coverage in your area. Not all auto insurers will cover high-risk drivers, so eligibility may also affect who is the best auto insurance company for you, depending on your situation. Discount opportunities may also affect which insurer is best, and these vary in availability by company and state.

How long will the points stay on my driving record?

Virginia car insurance laws indicate demerit points stay on your driving record for two to five years, depending on the severity and type of infraction. However, in Virginia, you may also earn safe driving points for taking part in an approved defensive driving course, which could help reduce the number of overall points on your motor vehicle record.

Why did my insurance costs increase after a speeding ticket in Virginia?

Insurance companies use a driver’s motor vehicle record (MVR) as a rating factor to help determine a driver’s risk. If a driver is convicted of a speeding ticket, then the risk to the insurance company is assumed to be greater. The higher amount of risk a driver has, the higher the premiums are typically set.

Methodology

Bankrate utilizes Quadrant Information Services to analyze 2021 rates for all ZIP codes and carriers in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. Quoted rates are based on 40-year-old male and female drivers with a clean driving record, good credit and the following full coverage limits:

  • $100,000 bodily injury liability per person
  • $300,000 bodily injury liability per accident
  • $50,000 property damage liability per accident
  • $100,000 uninsured motorist bodily injury per person
  • $300,000 uninsured motorist bodily injury per accident
  • $500 collision deductible
  • $500 comprehensive deductible

To determine minimum coverage limits, Bankrate used minimum coverages that meet each state’s requirements. Our base profile drivers own a 2019 Toyota Camry, commute five days a week and drive 12,000 miles annually.

Incident: Rates were calculated by evaluating our base profile with the following incidents applied: clean record (base) and a single speeding ticket.

These are sample rates and should only be used for comparative purposes.

Written by
Sara Coleman
Former Insurance Contributor
Sara Coleman is a former insurance contributor at Bankrate. She has a couple of years of experience in writing for insurance domains such as The Simple Dollar, Reviews.com, Coverage.com and numerous other personal finance sites. She writes about insurance products such as auto, homeowners, renters and disability.
Edited by
Managing Editor