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Current 7/1 ARM rates

On Sunday, May 19, 2024, the national average 7/1 ARM APR is 7.93%. The average 5/1 ARM APR is 7.88%, according to Bankrate's latest survey of the nation's ... largest mortgage lenders.

Today's 7/1 ARM loan interest rates

Lenders nationwide provide weekday mortgage interest rates to our comprehensive national survey to bring you the most current rates available. Here you can see the latest marketplace average interest rates for a wide variety of purchase loans. The table below is updated daily to give you the most current interest rates and APRs when choosing a home loan. Interest rates and APRs are based on no existing relationship or automatic payments. For these averages, the customer profile includes a 740 FICO score and a single-family residence. To learn more, see understanding Bankrate rate averages.

Product Interest Rate APR
7/1 ARM 6.76% 7.93%
5/1 ARM 6.63% 7.88%
10/1 ARM 7.05% 7.97%

Rates as of Sunday, May 19, 2024 at 6:30 AM

In general, ARM rates are lower than 30-year fixed-rate mortgages, but may not be lower than shorter-term fixed-rate loans. Compare ARM rates to other loan types with the chart below.

National mortgage rates by loan type 

Product Interest Rate APR
7-1 ARM 6.76% 7.93%
30-Year Fixed Rate 7.04% 7.09%
15-Year Fixed Rate 6.47% 6.55%
30-Year Fixed Rate FHA 6.91% 6.96%
30-Year Fixed Rate VA 7.03% 7.07%
30-Year Fixed Rate Jumbo 7.13% 7.19%

Rates as of Sunday, May 19, 2024 at 6:30 AM

 

 

What is a 7/1 ARM loan?

It’s important to think about your financial situation and what your goals are when considering an ARM. Here’s when a 7/1 ARM may be a good idea:

  • You’re planning on moving within seven years.
  • You’re planning to refinance before the seven years is up.
  • You expect your income to go up before the ARM adjusts.

Consider these pros and cons when making your decision:

Pros of a 7/1 ARM

  • Lower introductory rate and monthly payments: An ARM often comes with a lower initial interest rate than that of a comparable fixed-rate mortgage, giving you lower monthly payments for the loan’s fixed period. 
  • Monthly payments might decrease: If rates are lower at the time your ARM adjusts, your monthly payment could fall. Note that some ARMs have floor rates to limit how far the rate can decrease.
  • Good for short-term: An ARM can be appealing to those who want to sell before the rate adjusts, or who will plan to put rate savings into extra payments toward the principal.

Cons of a 7/1 ARM

  • Monthly payments might go up: If rates are higher after the intro period than when you took your loan out, your payments will increase. 
  • You’ll need to plan for rising rates: If you plan to hold onto the loan after the first adjustment, you’ll need to budget for potential upward adjustments every year.
  • More complicated to prepay: Because of how ARM interest rates are calculated, paying extra each month won’t significantly shorten your loan term, unlike with a fixed-rate mortgage. Instead, prepaying will affect your monthly payment more.

How does a 7/1 ARM work?

Adjustable-rate mortgages tend to start off with lower interest rates than their fixed-rate counterparts, so a borrower could qualify for a bigger mortgage because the payments will be lower, at least to start out.

After seven years, the interest rate on a 7/1 ARM adjusts annually. That can mean big changes to how much interest accrues, how much you owe and how much you have to pay every month.

The variable rate on an ARM is based on a benchmark, typically the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR). This rate fluctuates based on such factors as what’s happening in the global economy and how the Federal Reserve and other central banks are responding to those trends.

Your rate can’t balloon out of control, however. ARMs have caps, so your rate can only go up to a certain limit.

How to compare 7/1 ARM rates

  • Step 1: Strengthen your credit score - Before you start looking for a 7/1 ARM, give your finances a checkup, and improve your credit score if needed.
  • Step 2: Determine your budget - A 7/1 ARM can have a high monthly payment. You’ll need a good handle on how much house you can afford.
  • Step 3: Know your mortgage options - Before deciding on a 7/1 ARM loan, research different types of mortgages to make an informed decision.
  • Step 4: Compare rates and terms from several lenders - Rate-shop with at least three different banks or mortgage companies.
  • Step 5: Read lender reviews: Find out what people have to say about a lender before choosing it.
  • Step 6: Get preapproved for a mortgage - Getting a mortgage preapproval is the only way to get accurate loan pricing for your specific situation.

Lender compare

Compare mortgage lenders side by side

Mortgage rates and fees can vary widely across lenders. To help you find the right one for your needs, use this tool to compare lenders based on a variety of factors. Bankrate has reviewed and partners with these lenders, and the two lenders shown first have the highest combined Bankrate Score and customer ratings. You can use the drop downs to explore beyond these lenders and find the best option for you.

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Garden State Home Loans

NMLS: 473163

State License: MB-473163

3.6

Rating: 3.6 stars out of 5
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Rating: 4.98 stars out of 5

5.0

562reviews

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Homefinity

NMLS: 2289

State License: 4965

4.5

Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5
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Recent Customer Reviews

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Rating: 4.94 stars out of 5

4.9

1064reviews

7/1 ARM loan FAQ

Meet our Bankrate experts

Written by: Andrew Dehan, Writer, Home Lending

I’ve covered mortgages, real estate and personal finance since 2020. At Bankrate, I’m focused on all of the factors that affect mortgage rates and home equity. I enjoy distilling data and expert advice into takeaways borrowers can use. Prior to Bankrate, I wrote and edited for Rocket Mortgage/Quicken Loans. My work has been published by Business Insider, Forbes Advisor, SmartAsset, Crain’s Business and more.

Read more from Andrew Dehan

Edited by: Laurie Dupnock, Editor, Home Lending

I’ve spent five years in writing and editing roles, and I now focus on mortgage, mortgage relief, homebuying and mortgage refinancing topics. I’m most interested in providing resources for aspiring first-time homeowners to help demystify the homebuying process. In 2021, I earned a Poynter ACES Certificate in Editing. I have an MA in English. 

Read more from Laurie Dupnock