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Best credit card bonuses for June 2024

Updated June 13, 2024

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Sign-up bonuses are one of the best perks on a new credit card because you can earn a lump sum of cash back, points or miles after spending a certain amount in a set timeframe. On average, Americans have three or four credit cards in their wallets. If they earned a sign-up bonus on each of them, they could have hundreds of dollars of value.

The best sign-up bonuses can be worth hundreds to thousands of dollars, depending on your issuer and available redemption options, but it’s important to consider more than just the dollar value. The spending requirements to earn these bonuses must fit your budget. You’ll also want to ensure the credit card will provide you with value for years to come, not just your first year.

To make your decision easier, we’ve analyzed credit card sign-up bonuses and provided our top picks, along with tips to help you choose.

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Best for choice of cash back category

Bankrate score

Rating: 4.3 stars out of 5
4.3
Info
Recommended credit score: 670 - 850
Info
Apply now Lock
on Bank of America's secure site

Intro offer

Info

$200

Rewards rate

Info

1% - 3%

Annual fee

$0

Regular APR

19.24% - 29.24% Variable APR on purchases and balance transfers

Why you’ll like this card: It offers an easy-to-earn bonus and the flexibility to pick your top-rate bonus category, making it easier to maximize rewards.

Biggest travel sign-up bonus

Bankrate score

Rating: 4.8 stars out of 5
4.8
Info
Recommended credit score: 670 - 850
Info
Apply now Lock
on Chase's secure site

Intro offer

Info

60,000 bonus points

$1,200 value
Info

Rewards rate

Info

1x - 5x

Annual fee

$95

Regular APR

21.49% - 28.49% Variable

Why you’ll like this card: Its intro bonus is a great value thanks to Chase’s high-value points, and its fee is easy to offset.

Best business sign-up bonus

Bankrate score

Rating: 4.2 stars out of 5
4.2
Info
Recommended credit score: 670 - 850
Info
Apply now Lock
on Chase's secure site

Intro offer

Info

Earn $750 bonus cash back

$750 value
Info

Rewards Rate

Info

1.5%

Annual fee

$0

Regular APR

18.49% - 24.49% Variable

Why you’ll like this card: It boasts a streamlined rewards program and a more valuable intro bonus than most no-annual-fee cards.

Best airline sign-up bonus

Bankrate score

Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5
4.5
Info
Recommended credit score: 670 - 850
Info
Apply now Lock
on Chase's secure site

Intro offer

Info

Earn 85,000 points

$1,275 value
Info

Rewards rate

Info

1X - 2X

Annual fee

$69

Regular APR

21.49% - 28.49% Variable

Why you’ll like this card: Its intro bonus offers a terrific return on spend and a nice boost toward the Companion Pass, which could save you thousands on Southwest flights.

Compare Bankrate's top sign-up bonus credit cards

Card Welcome offer Annual fee Bankrate review score
Intro Offer: $200
Info
Regular APR: 19.24% - 29.24% Variable APR on purchases and balance transfers
$0

4.3 / 5

Info
(Read card review)
Apply now Lock
on Bank of America's secure site
Intro Offer: 60,000 bonus points
Info
Regular APR: 21.49% - 28.49% Variable
$95

4.8 / 5

Info
(Read card review)
Apply now Lock
on Chase's secure site
Intro Offer: Earn $750 bonus cash back
Info
Regular APR: 18.49% - 24.49% Variable
$0

4.2 / 5

Info
(Read card review)
Apply now Lock
on Chase's secure site
Intro Offer: Earn 85,000 points
Info
Regular APR: 21.49% - 28.49% Variable
$69

4.5 / 5

Info
(Read card review)
Apply now Lock
on Chase's secure site

What to know about credit card bonuses

A credit card bonus — whether it’s called a sign-up bonus, intro bonus or welcome offer — is an incentive for new cardholders. In most cases, you’ll need to spend a certain amount on purchases with your new card within a specified time period (usually three to six months) to earn these bonuses. They mostly come as cash back, points or travel miles, but can also be one-time discounts or gift cards.

Credit card bonuses can offer great value if you can meet the spending requirement. Although many card bonuses have relatively low spending requirements of just a few hundred dollars over three months, some require you to spend $6,000 or more. If you’re comparing bonus offers, consider whether it offers a good return on your spending (at least 20 percent for a consumer card). Also keep in mind the value of any points or miles earned — 100,000 points with one hotel brand may not hold the same value as 60,000 miles with an airline.

Sign-up bonus pros and cons

Before you apply for a card because it has an enticing bonus, consider the pros and cons:

Pros

  • Checkmark

    Competitive offers: People have plenty of credit card options, so card issuers offer strong bonuses to make their cards more attractive.

  • Checkmark

    Versatile redemptions: A bonus can be cash back, points or miles, and you can often use rewards to book travel just as easily as to lower your balance.

  • Checkmark

    Rewards for routine spending: Most cardholders will meet the spending requirements on several bonuses with routine spending, so you may not need to think much about earning them.

Cons

  • Spending requirements: Make sure the spending requirement fits your budget before applying for a card. Some bonuses carry spending requirements that will be difficult for the average person to meet without extra effort.

  • High interest rates: Bonuses are usually only available on cash back, business and rewards credit cards, which typically charge high interest rates. If you carry a balance from month to month, the interest you pay will undermine the value of the rewards and bonuses you earn.

  • Requires good credit: Most credit cards with bonuses require applicants to have good or excellent credit to qualify. Making on-time payments and keeping your account balances low are two of the most important ways to build credit fast.

Types of credit card bonuses

Credit card bonuses are typically distributed as additional cash back, points or miles. However, several types of welcome offers can be just as valuable — if not more so — than traditional, straightforward offers.

Best credit card bonuses by issuer

Different issuers offer various enticing rewards. Whether you're looking for cash back, travel points or other perks, knowing which issuers provide the best bonuses is important. However, it shouldn’t be your only deciding factor. You should choose a credit card based on all that it offers, not just its bonus. Here are some of the cards with the top offers from each issuer. 

Our data: Ranking credit card bonuses

Our points and miles valuations play a vital role when we’re evaluating and comparing credit card bonuses. After all, the number of points or miles that come with a bonus don’t mean much if their redemption value is low. Only by estimating the average redemption value of points and miles can we get a clear sense of the true value of a sign-up bonus. 

Many of the top rewards cards carry bonuses that are worth several hundreds or even thousands of dollars, but most carry a far lower value. 

Here’s a look at the top sign-up bonus offers currently available on this page, sorted by their estimated redemption value. You can also see the spending required to earn each bonus, as well as where its value ranks compared to the bonuses of other cards in the same category in our scoring database.

Card name Estimated value* Spending requirement Return on spend Value ranking*
Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card $1,200 Earn 60,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $750 when you redeem through Chase Travel℠. 37.5 percent Better value than 98 percent of all cards
Ink Business Unlimited® Credit Card $750 Earn $750 bonus cash back after you spend $6,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening 12.5 percent Better value than 65 percent of business cards
Southwest Rapid Rewards® Plus Credit Card $1,275 Earn 85,000 bonus points after spending $3,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. 42.5 percent Better value than 94 percent of rewards cards
Bank of America® Customized Cash Rewards credit card $200 $200 online cash rewards bonus after you make at least $1,000 in purchases in the first 90 days of account opening. 20 percent Better value than 60 percent of cash back cards

* Bonus values and rankings based on Bankrate’s points and miles valuations and the current bonus available on each card compared with the values of other cards’ bonuses in our rankings database.

As you can see, high-value bonuses don’t always offer the best return on spend, so the bonus that fits you best will depend not only on its total value, but also on your spending habits and which rewards are most useful to you.

When welcome offers are worth it

Some bonuses are quite valuable but carry a high spending requirement, sometimes upwards of $1,000. With this in mind, it’s important to evaluate a credit card bonus based on the value it offers relative to the spending required. 

For example, the Southwest Rapid Rewards® Plus Credit Card’s requires you to spend $3,000 in your first three months to earn 85,000 points (worth around $1,275 based on Bankrate’s airline point valuations). That is about 75 percent return on your spending — one of the most generous ratios you’ll find.

Compare that with the Delta SkyMiles® Platinum American Express Card, which offers 85,000 Delta SkyMiles after you spend $4,000 in your first six months (worth around $1,020 based on our valuations). That’s a 25 percent return on spend.

While return on spend is only one factor to consider when evaluating a bonus, it’s an easy way to assess which welcome offers are the most generous. As a rule of thumb, aim to get at least a 20 percent return on spend.  You should also keep in mind the redemption value of the bonus, the total spending required, the timeframe and how useful the rewards currency is based on your goals.

Welcome offers may also encourage cardholders to spend more than they usually would just for the sake of earning the bonus. This spending behavior can lead you into debt and interest charges that have the potential to undermine your bonus and any ongoing rewards. You should avoid this kind of spending at all costs and don’t count on your credit card bonus to pay your balance. 

If you want to apply for a card with a valuable bonus, make sure you can meet its spending requirement with your routine spending, unless there are large purchases you’d already planned to make that will help you reach the bonus faster.

What people say about the best sign-up bonuses

In various online forums, including Reddit, many users have recently singled out Capital One credit cards as offering some of the best sign-up bonuses on the market. Capital One bonuses are often cited as a major draw for prospective cardholders and are credited with helping users quickly earn valuable rewards.

One user highlights the Capital One Venture X Rewards Credit Card as offering an impressive sign-up and annual bonus, as well as great ongoing value (especially paired with the Capital One SavorOne Cash Rewards Credit Card):

I like the Capital One duo ([the Venture X and SavorOne]). The [Venture X] will give a nice…sign up bonus, and the statement credits + anniversary points easily cover the [annual fee].

Reddit User*

Another user cites the speed with which Capital One credits sign-up bonuses to cardholder accounts:

I like the lineup of Capital One cards. They always pay sign-up bonuses promptly, and they have good cash back with easy processes for redemption. They are also easier to deal with than the big banks.

Reddit User*

Along with praise for specific sign-up bonuses, users share general advice on how to find the rewards card that fits you best. One key point: Don’t let the bonus be the only feature you consider. 

One user emphasizes the importance of long-term value and picking the card that best fits your spending habits:

“No fee cards with modest bonuses are nice to take out routinely, but I try to be tactical about this where some of these cards have a long term use for specific categories…Hefty fee cards usually have higher bonuses, but [I] would encourage you to not force yourself to spend the money they offer - should be a natural fit into your life” 

Reddit User*

As you consider cards and card bonuses, you should also consider whether you can meet any spending requirements without overspending or going into debt. Additionally, create a plan for how you’ll redeem rewards to maximize the value of your sign-up bonus.

*The quotes and citations included on this page have been verified by our editorial team and are accurate as of the posting date. Be sure to check the issuer's website/terms and conditions for all up to date content. Outlinked content may contain views and opinions that do not reflect the views and opinions of Bankrate.

Expert advice for credit card bonuses

To make the most of a credit card bonus, you should continue to make wise credit decisions and avoid debt to keep your balance manageable, otherwise you might offset the value of your new bonus with interest charges. It’ll pay to research your card well; the more you know about your redemption options the more valuable your offer can end up being.

Plan ahead

Calculate the value of the sign-up bonus

It’s important to calculate the value of a sign-up bonus through the lens of your own financial goals. Although cards have different welcome offers, you can analyze many of them before applying to better understand which one fits your financial needs. Here are some quick tips for certain offers:

  • Rewards cards: If you want to earn travel points, look for a card that offers a bonus with points or miles and calculate the value of those points. Consider both the minimum redemption value offered by the rewards program as well as the potential value when you transfer to airline and hotel partners. You can use Bankrate’s points and miles valuation page as a guide when calculating the value of any potential bonus.
  • Cash back cards: Calculating a cash back sign-up bonus is straightforward since the dollar amount is already determined. Still, it may help to evaluate the offer based on a value-to-spending ratio if you want the best value (and aren’t worried about the spending requirement). 
  • Limited-time bonus categories: If you want to calculate a limited-time bonus category's welcome offer value, multiply your spending in that category or the category’s spending cap by the limited-time rewards rate to determine how much you can earn.

Spend normally

Only apply for cards with bonuses you can realistically reach

It's essential to use credit responsibly by making timely payments and staying within your budget. If you spend beyond your means you risk running up interest charges that can outpace the value of any bonus you earn. Deciding on the right card means choosing one that won’t pressure you to spend money you don’t have. If you need to spend money you can’t pay off right away to earn a one-time bonus, it might not be a good fit.

Research redemptions

Redeem your points or miles for the most value possible

If your bonus rewards you with points or miles, redeem your rewards wisely to make the most of it. Redeeming points and miles for cash back or gift cards typically results in the lowest value, usually 1 cent or less. However, redeeming points and miles on the issuer’s travel portal or transferring to travel partners can yield the best value.

Consider long-term value

Make sure the card fits well into your overall budget and lifestyle

New credit accounts lower your average account age, which can hurt your credit score. Avoid opening new cards just for the bonus, unless these cards will help you in the long term. While bonuses can be attractive incentives, they shouldn’t be the sole reason for choosing a credit card. Consider all aspects of the offer before making a decision that suits your financial goals and needs. Also, always remember to manage your credit responsibly by paying off balances in full each month and keeping track of any fees the card charges.

How this Bankrate expert chooses cards with sign-up bonuses

Here’s how Bankrate writer and credit card expert, Ryan Flanigan, filters through his options when looking for a new credit card with a sign-up bonus:

“Getting a good sign-up bonus is one of the most important factors to consider when opening a new card. I place a lot of focus on how the current offer compares to previous offers because getting a lower offer than what came before can be lost value.

I also think about how the card will meet my needs overall. If I have a travel goal with an airline or hotel, a sign-up bonus can give me a big boost toward the amount of miles or points I need. Also, will any bonus categories help me earn more points while spending towards meeting the bonus? The more value I can extract initially, the better set up I'll be towards meeting my travel or cash back goals.

Lastly, I consider if I can achieve the spending requirement in the allotted timeframe. The biggest mistake someone can make is failing to spend enough to earn the welcome bonus because you won't get another chance. If I have large upcoming expenses, I try to put them towards a new sign-up bonus. Strategic spending like this can help defray larger costs by giving me a bigger return. While there are definitely many factors to consider when picking the right card with an ideal sign-up bonus, I can get a ton of value when I manage my spending wisely.”

— Ryan Flanigan, Writer, Credit Cards

How we assess the best sign-up bonus credit cards

Document
250+
cards rated
Congrats
50+
rewards programs valued
Search
5000
data points analyzed
Credit Card Reviews
40+
perks evaluated

When evaluating the best credit cards with sign-up bonuses, we consider both the quality of a card bonus itself and the card’s long-term value, including its cost and perks. 

We calculate the value of each card’s bonus based on our internal point and mile valuations (assuming it’s not a cash bonus) and compare this to the value of bonuses available on cards in a similar category and at a similar price level. We also consider the spending required to earn each bonus.

After identifying cards that carry valuable bonuses with a high return on spend, we factor in how cards score overall in our proprietary card rating system and whether they offer features that fit the priorities of a diverse group of cardholders, from earning rewards to scoring a large sign-up bonus to saving on interest. 

We analyzed over 250 of the most popular credit cards and selected standouts with high-value sign-up bonuses. We scored each card based on the factors most relevant to its primary category, including its rewards rate, estimated annual earnings, intro APR period, ongoing APR, perks and more to determine whether it belonged in this month’s roundup. 

Here’s a quick look at the factors that make up our card scoring methodology for rewards, cash back and business cards (the card types most likely to offer sign-up bonuses), along with more information on how we assess the quality of sign-up bonuses themselves.

Rewards & cash back card scoring factors

5
Rating: 5 stars out of 5
Overall Score
  • Value 65%
  • Flexibility 15%
  • Perks 15%
  • Customer experience 5%

Business card scoring factors

5
Rating: 5 stars out of 5
Overall Score
  • Value 40%
  • Flexibility 20%
  • Perks 20%
  • Customer experience 20%

Frequently asked questions about credit cards with sign-up bonuses

Ask the experts: Should I continually look to apply for new cards, so that I can keep earning sign-up bonuses?


Contributor, Credit Cards

Sign-up bonuses are fabulous. They enable you to earn cash back, points, or miles after you hit the minimum spend. However, many credit card companies have rules in place that prevent you from earning the bonus each time you open a new account with them. Check the issuer’s restrictions before you keep opening new credit card accounts. Still, even with an attractive bonus, you should only pursue the credit cards you need and will use. After all, every card you have must be managed, so if you have too many, you may unnecessarily complicate your life!

Financial Educator, Debt and Credit

There’s nothing wrong with opening a new account to earn a bonus, but keep in mind two factors that can negatively impact your credit score. First, frequent hard pulls of your credit report, which are required as part of a new account application process, may lower your score. Second, having too many accounts with a short length of credit history, may also have a negative effect. For these reasons, it’s typically not a good idea to constantly open new lines of credit. Opening one or two new lines per year is usually fine, but take care to pay off balances in full every month so that you don’t negate the benefit of the sign-up bonuses by paying high interest rates on revolving balances.

Contributor, Personal Finance

Sign-up bonuses are a great benefit of some new credit cards, but you’ll want to be strategic about how often you’re applying for new cards just to get the big bonus points. Opening new lines of credit does affect your credit score, so apply wisely — especially if you’re considering applying for a large line of credit like a mortgage where your score plays an important factor. Many banks have also instituted rules about frequent bonus earning. You may not be able to get a bonus more than once in a lifetime, or within a lengthy time period, on a specific card, so you’ll want to check these rules first. It’s not bad to have multiple cards, but it’s important to consider your short and longer term earning plan before you start applying.