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TD Double Up Credit Card review: Good flat-rate cash back for East Coast cardholders

Appealing flat-rate rewards and perks if you’re on the East Coast.

 /  14 min
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At Bankrate we strive to help you make smarter financial decisions. While we adhere to strict , this post may contain references to products from our partners. Here's an explanation for and how we rate our cards. The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date; however, some of the offers mentioned may have expired. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any card issuer.

Snapshot

4.0

Bankrate rating
Info
Rating: 4 stars out of 5

Bottom line

This card offers a top-tier flat cash back rate, but its limited availability and mediocre sign-up bonus may limit its appeal.

Only Available in 15 East Coast States and D.C.
4.0
Rating: 4 stars out of 5
Bankrate score
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See Terms
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Recommended Credit

2% Cash Back

Rewards rate

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Annual fee

Intro offer

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Regular APR

TD Double Up Credit Card overview

Cash back credit cards remain a popular choice in the world of rewards cards, and the best 2 percent flat-rate cards stand as favorites even in this packed arena. Despite the competition, TD Bank’s TD Double Up Credit Card emerges as a good rewards cards thanks to its $0 annual fee, notable Visa Signature benefits and top-tier cash back rate on general purchases. However, there are several noticeable gaps in its armor that prevent it from being great.

The biggest blow to the card is its narrow footprint, since the card is only available in eastern U.S. states. However, factors like its undersized sign-up bonus, missing intro APR on purchases and cash back redemption minimum water down the card’s value enough to make it hard to recommend over its rivals unless you’d rather stick with TD Bank.

Heads-up: This card is only available in certain states

TD Bank credit cards are only available on the in 14 East Coast states (and Washington D.C.): Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia.
  • Credit Card Cash Back

    Rewards

    • Unlimited 2 percent cash rewards on all eligible purchases

    Expert Appraisal: Good
    See our expert analysis

  • Rewards

    Welcome offer

    • $150 statement credit after spending $1,000 in purchases within the first 90 days of account opening

    Expert Appraisal: Unimpressive
    See our expert analysis

  • Credit Card Apr

    0% intro APR offer

    • No 0 percent intro APR on purchases
    • 0% introductory APR balance transfers for first 15 billing cycles after account opening.
    • 20.24%, 25.24% or 30.24% variable APR based on your creditworthiness.

    Expert Appraisal: Typical
    See our expert analysis

  • Credit Card Search

    Rates and fees

    • No annual fee
    • 3 percent balance transfer fee ($5 minimum)
    • 3 percent foreign transaction fee
    • No penalty APR
    • Up to $40 fee for late payments and returned payments

    Expert Appraisal: Typical
    See our expert analysis

  • Congrats

    Other cardholder perks

    • Cellphone protection when paying your monthly phone bill with the card: Up to two $500 claims per 12 months, up to $1,000 in that period (minus a $50 deductible)
    • Lost or stolen card reporting service and emergency card replacement
    • Digital wallet/contactless payment functionality
    • 24/7 pay-per-use roadside dispatch assistance
    • Partner perks with services including Sofar Sounds presale entertainment tickets and Shipt expedited shipping
    • Additional Visa Signature perks (if you qualify), including purchase protection, extended warranty coverage, lost luggage reimbursement, car rental benefits (with Avis, Budget and Audi on demand rentals) and Visa Luxury Hotel Collection privileges.

    Expert Appraisal: Typical
    See our expert analysis

TD Double Up pros and cons

Pros

  • Checkmark

    Carries one of the best flat cash back rates available

  • Checkmark

    There is no annual fee, putting it on the same playing field as other 2 percent cash back cards.

  • Checkmark

    Perks like cellphone protection are decent for a no-annual-fee cash back card, and its travel benefits are even better if you qualify for a Visa Signature card.

Cons

  • The card is only available if you live in certain east coast states, and TD Bank branches are rare outside the U.S. northeast.

  • There is no intro APR on purchases, so it falls short of many competing cards that offer at least 0 percent for 15 months.

  • Its sign-up bonus not only carries half the value of many no-annual-fee cash back card bonuses, but also requires double the typical spending.

  • You can only redeem cash back once you’ve earned at least $25 in rewards (2,500 points). Competing cards typically don’t have a minimum redemption amount.

Why you might want the TD Double Up

If you’re looking for low-cost, easy-to-earn cash back rate no matter where you make your purchases, the TD Double Up card is one of the most rewarding flat-rate cards outside major issuers like Wells Fargo and Citi. Plus, it packs one of the best perk rosters available for no annual fee.

Rewards: Top-tier flat cash back rate

The TD Double Up card ranks among the best flat-rate cash back cards thanks to its unlimited 2 percent cash back on all eligible purchases. Few cards even earn 2 percent back on your general spending, and the TD Double Up is one of the only cards in that class that don’t require extra hoops to jump through.

There’s a solid variety of redemption options as well. The rewards are earned as “bonus points,” which are then redeemable at 1 cent per point toward cash back, gift cards, travel or merchandise. Since your points can’t increase in value toward travel, it’s probably wise to redeem for cash back considering its the most flexible option. You can receive cash back as a statement credit or direct deposit to a checking or savings account (as long as the financial institution is in the U.S.).

Not all major cash back cards allow you to redeem for a convenient direct deposit, so that’;s a convenient advantage in the TD Double Up card’s favor. On the flip side, you can only redeem for cash back once you’ve earned at least 2,500 points — equal to $25 cash back. This might not make or break your decision, but it’s worth noting that most competing cards allow you to redeem at any amount instead of making you wait until you’ve racked up at least $1,250 of rewards spending.

Rates and fees: No annual fee to offset

The TD Double Up card is a low-cost card with no annual fee or penalty APR to worry about. This is pretty common for many cash back cards, especially flat-rate rewards cards, and the 3 percent foreign transaction fee and up to $40 fee for late and returned payments are typical as well. 

The low end of the 20.24 percent, 25.24 percent, or to 30.24 percent variable APR is on par with the current average credit card interest rate, but the higher end can be a bit higher than other cash back cards’ rates. However, the TD Double Up card’s 3 percent balance transfer fee ($5 minimum) can more than make up for this if you plan to transfer your balance after the first few months considering several cash back cards’ transfer fees increase to 5 percent by that point.

Perks: Great benefits for Visa Signature cardholders

The TD Double Up card’s starting perks are better than the basic features many competing cash back cards offer. The suite of benefits is respectable, carrying staples like account monitoring, emergency card replacement and 24/7 pay-per-use roadside assistance. It’s one of the few cards with cellphone protection, offering up to $500 per claim (up to two claims per year, minus a $50 deductible) if your phone is damaged or stolen and you your monthly cellphone bill with the card. There are a few partner perks as well, for Sofar Sounds presale entertainment tickets and expedited shipping via Shipt, but they’re hit-or-miss compared to the handy cellphone protection.

The TD Double Up is much more impressive if you qualify for the Visa Signature version of the card. This sweetens the deal with safeguards like purchase protection, extended warranty coverage and lost luggage reimbursement. Plus, Visa Signature status adds on extra travel features like Visa Concierge assistance and savings and privileges with Visa Signature Luxury Hotel properties and car rentals with Audi on demand, Avis and Budget. 

These protections and travel perks put this card a rung above several other popular cash back cards since they typically come with barebones benefits. In fact, there are only other two major no-annual-fee cards with arguably better benefits: the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express for its monthly streaming credits, and the Chase Freedom Unlimited®.

Why you might want a different cash rewards card

Although the TD Double Up has a high-caliber flat cash back rate and decent benefits, the below-average intro offers will probably water down this card enough to push away some potential cardholders.

Welcome offer: More work for less value

A $1,000 spending requirement within 90 days probably isn’t too hard to meet, especially since it’s great to use the TD Double Up for the bulk of your everyday expenses. However, a $150 value (earned as 15,000 points) isn’t a great payday for that much effort. In fact, the typical sign-up bonus that cash rewards cards offer usually weighs in at a $200 value after a $500 spend within the similar three-month timeframe. That’s essentially half the value for double the spend.

Granted, a $1,000 spending requirement isn’t uncommon in this card class, and an easy $150 isn’t anything to scoff at. However, similar cards generally offer a higher welcome bonus, even if they require a $1,000 spending requirement.

0% APR offer: No intro APR on purchases

No-annual-fee cash back cards often carry a 0 percent intro APR on both purchases and balance transfers for 15 months, so it’s a bit disappointing to see the TD Double Up card fall short with just 0 percent intro APR on balance transfers for 15 months (then a 20.24%, 25.24% or 30.24% variable APR based on your creditworthiness.). Missing an intro APR on purchases is especially impactful considering this is a rewards card designed to take on the bulk of your spending.

The lackluster intro APR offer might not be a deal-breaker if you don’t expect to pay off purchases over time. However, rival cards may be a more robust choice if you think you could use some breathing room to pay off upcoming purchases that might pile up while you settle your balance.

How the TD Double Up card compares to other cash back cards

The TD Double Up card’s great flat-rate rewards and benefits set it up to take on top flat-rate cash back cards, but its few weaknesses are big enough to hold the card back from seriously competing. Even if you live in an eligible state, the weaker intro APR and sign-up bonus makes this card hard to recommend over widely available options unless TD Bank is convenient for you.

Image of TD Double Up Credit Card
Bankrate Score
See Rates & Fees , Terms Apply
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on TD Bank's secure site

Annual fee

None

Intro offer

$150 Cash Back
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Rewards rate

2% Cash Back
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Recommended Credit Score

See Terms
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Image of Wells Fargo Active Cash® Card
Bankrate Score
See Rates & Fees , Terms Apply
Apply now Lock
on Wells Fargo's secure site

Annual fee

$0

Intro offer

$200 cash rewards
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Rewards rate

2%
Info

Recommended Credit Score

Good to Excellent (670 – 850)
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Image of Chase Freedom Unlimited®
Bankrate Score
Apply now Lock
on Chase's secure site

Annual fee

$0

Intro offer

Up to $300 cash back
Info

Rewards rate

1.5% - 5%
Info

Recommended Credit Score

Good to Excellent (670 – 850)
Info

Best cards to pair with the TD Double Up

Flat-rate cash back cards are the perfect candidates to shore up your rewards strategy. It’s smart to maximize your flat-rate card by partnering it with a card that provides higher-rate categories tailored to your biggest expenses. Meanwhile the TD Double Up can cover all your other purchases. TD Bank doesn’t offer a premium travel card to enhance your cash back through transfer travel partners, though, so feel free to go with a travel card of your choosing.

Who is the TD Double Up right for?

If any of these profiles resonate with you, the TD Double up could be a great fit for your rewards strategy.

Bankrate’s Take — Is the TD Double Up card worth it?

The TD Double Up is undoubtedly one of the most rewarding picks on the market if you want to rake in as much cash back as possible on all your purchases. In fact, it’s surprising to see such a card with such strong flat-rate rewards and perks outside of the major issuers. However, the card’s limited locational availability, $25 cash back redemption minimum and weak intro offers make reigning 2 percent flat-rate cards stronger options.

How we rated this card

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perks evaluated

Our proprietary card rating system takes into account a mix of factors when scoring balance transfer and low-interest cards, including each card’s introductory APR, intro APR period length, ongoing APR, balance transfer fee, perks and more.

While balance transfer and low-interest cards share a similar ratings rubric, we weigh features differently based on how a card is categorized. We categorize cards that carry an especially long intro APR offer on balance transfers as dedicated balance transfer cards, while cards that offer an especially low ongoing APR are considered general low-interest cards. 

Based on its features, we assigned this card a primary category of balance transfer and tailored our ratings accordingly. 

We analyzed over 100 of the most popular balance transfer and low-interest cards and scored each based on how its key features stacked up against those of other cards in its category. 

Here’s a breakdown of what gave this card its score:

Frequently asked questions

Written by
Garrett Yarbrough
Writer, Credit Cards

Bankrate expert Garrett Yarbrough strives to make navigating credit cards and credit building smooth sailing for his readers. After regularly featuring his credit card, credit monitoring and identity theft analysis on NextAdvisor.com, he joined the CreditCards.com and Bankrate teams as a staff writer to develop product reviews and comprehensive credit card guides focused on cash back, credit scores and card offers.

Edited by Senior Editor, Credit Cards

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Editorial Disclosure: Opinions expressed here are the author's alone, and have not been reviewed or approved by any advertiser. The information, including card rates and fees, is accurate as of the publish date. All products or services are presented without warranty. Check the bank’s website for the most current information.