Capital One Venture vs. Capital One VentureOne Rewards Credit Card

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The Capital One VentureOne Rewards Credit Card and the Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card are two of Capital One’s travel credit cards. If you’re trying to decide between applying for a Capital One Venture or a VentureOne credit card, this article will help you pick the right card for you.

Key features

The Venture and VentureOne cards both earn rewards in Capital One’s proprietary Venture miles currency, but their welcome bonuses and rewards rates are different. Here’s a look at some of the key features of these two cards.

Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card Capital One VentureOne Rewards Credit Card
Welcome bonus 60,000 miles once you spend $3,000 on purchases within 3 months from account opening, equal to $600 in travel 20,000 bonus miles (worth up to $200 in travel) if you spend $500 within the first three months of having the card
Rewards rate 2X miles on all purchases 1.25X miles on all purchases
Intro APR N/A 0 percent introductory APR for the first 12 months on purchases
Annual fee $95 $0
Global Entry or TSA Precheck Up to $100 credit toward Global Entry or TSA Precheck every four years N/A

As you can see, the cards share similarities, but a few key differences can make it challenging to decide between the two.

Capital One Venture vs. VentureOne highlights

Both the Venture and VentureOne cards earn Capital One Venture miles. One way you can use Venture miles is for travel purchases, at a rate of 1 cent per mile. Cardholders of either the VentureOne or Venture can also transfer their Venture miles to a variety of airline and hotel partners.

If you already have a Capital One credit card, you can earn a bonus by referring other people, such as your family members or friends, to apply for one of these Capital One cards.

Welcome bonus winner: Capital One Venture

The Venture card’s welcome bonus is significantly better than what the VentureOne card offers. With the Venture card, you’ll earn 60,000 miles once you spend $3,000 on purchases within 3 months from account opening . That’s a travel value of $600 more with the Venture card as compared to the VentureOne card.

Rewards rate winner: Capital One Venture

Again, the Capital One Venture card is a clear winner in terms of rewards rate. It earns unlimited double miles on all purchases, while the Capital One VentureOne card earns unlimited 1.25 miles on all purchases.

Annual fee winner: Capital One VentureOne

The VentureOne card has no annual fee, while the Venture card has a $95 annual fee. If you’re leaning toward the latter, you’ll need to evaluate how much you plan to spend with it and decide if your rewards earnings will offset the annual fee.

Foreign transaction fee winner: Tie

Neither the VentureOne nor the Venture card charges foreign transaction fees. This makes either of these two credit cards a great choice to take with you when traveling abroad.

Which card earns the most?

When talking about the earning rate of the Venture versus VentureOne cards, we have a clear winner. The Capital One Venture card earns 2 Venture miles for every dollar, compared to only 1.25 miles per dollar with the VentureOne card. It’s important to keep in mind, though, that the Capital One Venture card has a $95 annual fee, which could make a difference in deciding which card is right for you.

Capital One Venture vs. VentureOne Rewards spending example

In order to get a true look at deciding between the Venture and VentureOne, it’s important to consider how the annual fee and rewards rates will work out based on how much you spend. Let’s take a look at two examples to see where they compare:

  • Capital One Venture card: $12,667 spending at 2 miles per dollar yields $253.34 in rewards. Subtracting the $95 annual fee, this gives you net rewards of $158.34.
  • Capital One VentureOne card: $12,667 spending at 1.25 miles per dollar yields $158.34 in rewards.

As you can see, the break-even point between the two cards is $12,667 in spending each year. If you plan to spend more than that amount on one of these two cards, the Capital One Venture card makes the most sense. If you plan to spend less, then consider the Capital One VentureOne Rewards card. It’s also important to note that for the first year, the increased welcome bonus and Global Entry/TSA Precheck perk with the Venture card make it a clear winner, even with the $95 annual fee.

Why should you get Capital One Venture?

Most people looking to apply for the Capital One Venture or VentureOne card should apply for the Venture card. The increased welcome offer more than offsets the $95 annual fee. Throw in the Global Entry/TSA Precheck benefit that you can take advantage of once every four years, and you’ll almost certainly come out ahead with the Venture card.

Additional benefits

One big benefit that the Capital One Venture card has that the Capital One VentureOne card does not have is the Global Entry/TSA Precheck benefit. With the Capital One Venture card, you can get the application fee for either Global Entry or TSA Precheck reimbursed once every four years. This benefit is worth up to $100 and would more than offset the annual fee in the year that it is used.

Redemption options

You generally will want to redeem your Venture miles in one of three different ways. First, you can use your Venture miles to book travel through Capital One’s travel center at a rate of 1 cent per mile. You can also use your miles at the same rate to erase past travel purchases that you made with other travel providers. Finally, you can use your miles to transfer to one of Capital One’s 15 hotel and airline transfer partners. You do have other options for redeeming your Venture miles, such as gift cards and merchandise, but these offer poor value compared to using your points for travel.

Recommended credit score

Capital One recommends that applicants for the Capital One Venture credit card have Good to Excellent credit. That means you should have a credit score between 670 and 850.

Why should you get the Capital One VentureOne Rewards card?

If you don’t like the idea of paying an annual fee, you might consider the Capital One VentureOne Rewards card. Additionally, the VentureOne card might be a good choice if you’re planning a large purchase soon and want to take advantage of the introductory APR.

Additional benefits

The VentureOne card offers an introductory 0 percent APR on purchases for the first 12 months that you have the card (then 15.49 percent to 25.49 percent variable APR). This could come in handy if you have large purchases that you are planning on making in the first year with the card.

Redemption options

Unlike some other flexible rewards currencies like Chase Ultimate Rewards, the miles that you earn with the no-fee VentureOne card do not come with restrictions on redemption. This means that you can redeem the Venture miles you earn with your VentureOne card for the same things you could with the Venture card. You can redeem your Venture miles on travel at 1 cent per mile or transfer them to Capital One’s airline or hotel transfer partners.

Recommended credit score

Capital One recommends that applicants for the Capital One VentureOne credit card have Good to Excellent credit. That means a credit score between 670 and 850.

The bottom line

The Capital One VentureOne and Capital One Venture cards are both travel cards that earn Capital One Venture miles. Most people will be better off with the Venture card because of the higher welcome offer and higher rewards earning rate. Applicants who are averse to annual fees or looking to take advantage of the introductory APR offer on purchases might consider the VentureOne card.

Written by
Dan Miller
Points and Miles Expert Contributor
Dan Miller is a contributing writer for Bankrate. Dan writes about loans, home equity and debt management.