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Amex Gold vs. Chase Sapphire Preferred

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When it comes to the best travel credit cards, the American Express® Gold Card and the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card frequently make the cut. Both cards feature flexible ways to redeem rewards, plus they come with much lower annual fees than top tier premium travel cards. They also make it easy to boost rewards in everyday categories like dining and travel thanks to their generous earning rates.

But which of these flexible rewards cards is best for you? That really depends on which categories you spend the most in, as well as which transfer partners you want access to. Read on to learn our take on how these two cards stack up.

Main Details

American Express® Gold Card Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card
Welcome bonus Earn 60,000 Membership Rewards points when you spend $4,000 on purchases within 6 months of account opening Earn 60,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points when you spend $4,000 on purchases within 3 months of account opening
Rewards rate
  • 4X points on restaurant, Uber Eats and U.S. supermarket purchases (on up to $25,000 in purchases per year, then 1X points)
  • 3X points on flights booked directly with airlines or American Express Travel
  • 2X points on rental cars booked through American Express Travel
  • 1X points on other purchases
  • 5X points on travel booked through Chase Ultimate Rewards
  • 5X points on Lyft rides (through March 2025)
  • 3X points on dining, online grocery purchases and select streaming services
  • 2X points on other travel
  • 1X points on other purchases
Regular APR Variable APR of 18.24 percent to 25.24percent Variable APR of 16.74 percent to 23.74 percent
Annual fee $250 $95

Amex Gold vs. Chase Sapphire Preferred highlights

Comparing the Amex Gold Card and the Chase Sapphire Preferred can be tricky since these two cards earn different types of rewards. However, depending on the category, one card may offer more value than the other.

Welcome bonus winner: Amex Gold Card

While the Chase Sapphire preferred lets users earn 60,000 bonus points after spending $4,000 on purchases within three months of account opening, the Amex Gold Card offers that same 60,000-point bonus for the same $4,000 in spending within six months of account opening.

Thus, we give the Amex Gold Card the slight edge here since you only have to spend an average of $667 per month for six months to earn the bonus, whereas the Chase Sapphire Preferred requires average spending of at least $1,334 for three months.

Rewards rate winner: Chase Sapphire Preferred

While the Amex Gold Card boasts a lucrative rewards rate in its own right—especially for foodies—the Chase Sapphire Preferred’s earning rate wins in this category. Not only does the Chase Sapphire Preferred have broader and better bonus categories, but cardholders can earn unlimited bonus points in each.

After all, cardholders get the chance to earn 5X points on any travel through Chase (after earning the $50 anniversary hotel credit) and 5X points on Lyft rides through March 2022. Cardholders also earn 3X points on dining, online grocery purchases and select streaming services, 2X points on other travel and 1X points on other purchases.

Annual fee winner: Chase Sapphire Preferred

The Amex Gold Card requires an annual fee of $250 per year, whereas the Chase Sapphire Preferred will set you back just $95 per year. All things considered, the Chase Sapphire Preferred scores an easy win in this category.

Foreign transaction fee winner: Tie

Neither one of these cards charges foreign transaction fees on purchases made outside of the U.S. This is an important consideration for frequent travelers, and both cards are winners here.

Which card earns the most?

So, which travel credit card will leave you with more rewards in the end? Your own points haul will depend on how much you spend and which categories you spend the most in. Consider the spending example below and how it might look the same (or different) based on your spending habits.

Amex Gold Card vs. Chase Sapphire Preferred spending example

Let’s imagine you have a family of four with two adults (male and female) under the age of 50 and two kids (a boy and a girl) ages 12 and 13. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates that your average food spending would be about $1,224.70 per month (or $14,696.40 per year) on a moderate plan.

Let’s also imagine that you spend $300 per month ($3,600 per year) at restaurants, $3,600 per year on airfare and $2,400 per year on hotels and other travel. You also spend $1,000 per month ($12,000 per year) on miscellaneous purchases.

With the Amex Gold Card, you would earn a total of 98,388 Amex Membership Rewards points per year:

  • 58,788 points at U.S. supermarkets
  • 14,400 points on dining
  • 10,800 points on directly-booked airfare or through American Express Travel
  • 2,400 points on hotels and other travel
  • 12,000 points on miscellaneous purchases

With the Chase Sapphire Preferred, you would earn a total of 96,891 Chase Ultimate Rewards points per year:

  • 44,091 points on online grocery services
  • 10,800 points on dining
  • 18,000 points on airfare booked through Chase
  • 12,000 points on hotels and other travel booked through Chase
  • 12,000 points on miscellaneous purchases

Why should you get the Amex Gold Card?

The Amex Gold Card’s earning potential may make it seem like the clear winner, but there are more reasons to consider this card over the Chase Sapphire Preferred.

Additional benefits

The Amex Gold Card comes with up to $120 in Uber Cash each year ($10 per month), which can be applied to rides with Uber or Uber Eats orders. Cardholders also receive a dining credit worth up to $120 per year, which is also extended in increments of $10 per month. This credit applies when you use your Amex Gold Card to pay for purchases at Grubhub, Seamless, The Cheesecake Factory, Ruth’s Chris Steak House, Boxed and participating Shake Shack locations.

This card also comes with a hotel credit worth up to $100 when you book an eligible stay with The Hotel Collection through American Express Travel. This credit is good for stays of at least two consecutive nights, and it can be applied to room upgrades upon arrival (if available) or eligible dining, spa and resort activities.

Other Amex Gold benefits include purchase protection against damage or theft, extended warranties, secondary auto rental coverage, access to a Global Assist hotline and a baggage insurance plan.

Redemption options

One of the more important reasons to consider the Amex Gold card is if you want to earn points in the American Express Membership Rewards program. You can use these points for merchandise, gift cards, statement credits and travel through the Amex travel portal. Membership Rewards points can also be transferred to Amex airline and hotel partners like Air France/Flying Blue, Delta SkyMiles, JetBlue, Choice Privileges and Marriott Bonvoy, among others.

Recommended credit score

The Amex Gold Card requires applicants to have good to excellent credit (670 to 850) to qualify for the card. However, you may have a better chance of approval if you have a FICO score of 700 or higher.

Why should you get the Chase Sapphire Preferred?

If you’re intrigued by the Chase Sapphire Preferred’s rewards rates and earning potential, you should know there are even more reasons to sign up.

Additional benefits

The Chase Sapphire Preferred comes with several unique perks. Cardholders will get a $50 annual hotel credit through Chase Ultimate Rewards, a 10 percent anniversary point bonus and 25 percent more value for travel when they redeem their points through Chase for hotels, airfare, rental cars and more.

Other benefits include a DoorDash DashPass membership for one year (offer expires March 31, 2022), trip cancellation and interruption insurance, baggage delay insurance, trip delay coverage, travel and emergency assistance services, primary auto rental coverage, purchase protection and extended warranties on eligible items.

Redemption options

Chase Ultimate Rewards points are notoriously easy to redeem, even for those who rarely travel. Redemption options include cash back, statement credits, gift cards, merchandise, Chase Experience events and travel. And remember, cardholders also get 25 percent more value when redeeming points for travel through Chase.

The Chase Ultimate Rewards program has its own unique list of airline and hotel transfer partners, which include Southwest Rapid Rewards, United MileagePlus, Marriott Bonvoy, World of Hyatt and more.

Recommended credit score

The Chase Sapphire Reserve requires applicants to have good to excellent credit (670 to 850) to qualify for the card. However, you may have a better chance if you have a FICO score of 700 or higher.

The bottom line

Both the Amex Gold Card and Chase Sapphire Preferred are worth considering if you spend a lot on everyday purchases and you want flexible redemption options. However, the right card for you depends on which categories you spend the most in and how you plan to redeem your rewards.

That said, it never hurts to compare these cards with other rewards cards, including other cards from Chase and American Express. With some research and comparison shopping, you may be able to find a card that can boost your rewards by a lot more.

Written by
Holly D. Johnson
Author, Award-Winning Writer
Holly Johnson writes expert content on personal finance, credit cards, loyalty and insurance topics. In addition to writing for Bankrate and CreditCards.com, Johnson does ongoing work for clients that include CNN, Forbes Advisor, LendingTree, Time Magazine and more.
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