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Car insurance for married couples

Updated Dec 12, 2023
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Key takeaways

  • Married people typically enjoy slightly lower car insurance rates on average.
  • You typically won’t have a choice about adding your spouse to your car insurance once you are married (or even if you aren’t married but are living together).
  • Married couples could get access to savings opportunities like multi-car or bundling discounts for even cheaper rates.

When you get married, a lot of things in your life change. Insurance might be the last thing on your mind, but one of the first things you should consider updating is your car insurance. The good news is that tying the knot could help you save money on your auto insurance. On top of potentially lowering your premiums, your insurance needs may have changed since you got married as well, making this a good opportunity to consider whether you want to change your coverage types or limits. Bankrate’s insurance editorial team breaks down car insurance for married people so you can decide the best way to approach it for you and your spouse.

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Does being married get me better car insurance rates?

Yes, married couples typically pay lower premiums than single people. In general, insurance companies view married people as financially stable and having more life experience. That can mean fewer accidents and claims.

The national annual average cost of car insurance is $2,014 for a single 40-year-old driver. Married couples pay an average of 6 percent less for full coverage and 4 percent less for minimum coverage. Keep in mind that the amount you ultimately pay depends on other factors than being married, like your collective driving histories, credit-based insurance scores (in most states), the cars you drive and your claims history. 

This table shows the average difference in premium paid by single drivers and married couples from some of the best car insurance companies on the market. If you’re considering working with one of these companies, be sure to take the time to shop around and compare rates to see which one is best for you.

Company Average annual full coverage premium for married drivers Average annual full coverage premium for single drivers
Amica $1,509 $1,467
Auto-Owners $1,366 $1,361
Erie $1,391 $1,356
Geico $1,317 $1,353
Nationwide $1,383 $1,422
Progressive $1,551 $1,642
State Farm $1,475 $1,480
Travelers $1,485 $1,551
USAA $1,166 $1,361

Do I have to add my spouse to my car insurance policy?

While it depends on your insurer, most will require that you add your spouse to your policy once you’re married. In fact, if you are living together before you’re married, you may already be required to add your significant other to your policy by many car insurance companies. 

Remember that, once you’re married, updating your policy to reflect that will likely mean some small savings on your policy (if all other things remain equal). 

If you were not already on the same policy and your new spouse has a bad driving record, a poor credit history (in most states) or a much more expensive car, you could see your premiums go up. 

Named driver exclusion

As we briefly mentioned, for the most part, insurers require that any driver living in the same household as you be listed on your policy. Some insurers offer a way around this, letting you list specific excluded drivers. These are people that live in your house but that are not covered by your policy.

That means that if the person drives your car, they won’t have insurance. If they get into an accident, you’ll be fully liable for the damage. It’s also worth noting that most insurers won’t let you list a spouse as an excluded driver. But if you haven’t gotten married yet and live together, it might be an option.

Should my spouse and I have separate policies?

Getting a separate car insurance policy from your spouse is difficult. Few insurers will let you get separate policies unless there are extenuating circumstances, such as living in different states. If you’re in an unusual situation and need separate policies, it’s best to call your insurance company and ask for options.

Marriage discounts

Most companies offer a variety of car insurance discounts to help you save on your premium. While there generally is not a specific “marriage discount,” you may have access to discounts that you did not have access to before you were married.

  • Multi-car discount: If both you and your spouse own a car, you might be able to get a discount by covering both cars with one policy. The discount can be significant, sometimes as much as 25 percent. It’s also easier to manage one multi-car policy than two single-car policies.
  • Multi-policy discount: Often called a bundling discount, this lets you save money when you combine all of your insurance policies with one company, potentially leading to discounts. For example, if you use the same insurer for auto insurance and homeowners insurance, you could save money.
  • Homeowner discount: If you and your spouse buy a home together, it may help you lower your auto insurance premiums. Homeowners are typically viewed as financially stable and lower risk, so companies like Liberty Mutual, Progressive and Travelers offer this discount.

Frequently asked questions

Written by
TJ Porter
Contributor, Personal Finance

TJ Porter is a contributing writer for Bankrate with eight years of experience writing about finance.  TJ writes about a range of subjects, from budgeting tips to bank account reviews.

Edited by Senior Editor, Insurance