Best homeowners insurance in Oregon in 2021

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For the 62.9% of Oregon residents who own houses, finding the best homeowners insurance in Oregon doesn’t have to be a chore. The average cost of home insurance in Oregon is $712 per year for $250,000 in dwelling coverage, which is far below the United States national average rate of $1,312 per year, according to Bankrate’s 2021 study of quoted annual premiums. Your home may be the largest purchase you will ever make, so having the best Oregon homeowners insurance to protect your finances is important.

If you are looking for Oregon home insurance, there are several criteria you may want to use to evaluate a company. Bankrate’s insurance editorial team has reviewed the largest home insurance carriers by market share in Oregon to help you find a policy that fits your needs.

Best home insurance companies in Oregon

As we researched Oregon homeowners insurance companies, we first analyzed average premiums obtained from Quadrant Information Services. We also reviewed each company’s policy features, coverage options, discounts and customer satisfaction scores.

The companies below may be a good starting place when you are shopping for the best Oregon homeowners insurance:

Home insurance company Average annual premium for $250K dwelling J.D. Power score
Allstate $1,039 829/1,000
Grange Insurance Association $512 Not rated
State Farm $821 829/1,000
Travelers $448 803 / 1,000
USAA* $683 889/1,000

*Not officially ranked by J.D. Power due to eligibility restrictions

Allstate

Allstate’s home insurance policies are more expensive than the average rate in Oregon, but this could be due to the wide array of optional coverage choices that Allstate offers. With a policy from Allstate, you may be able to add coverage for sports equipment, musical instruments, business property and electronic data recovery. You may also be able to lower your premium with the company’s discounts for being claims-free, being a new home buyer, paying on time and switching to Allstate from another insurance carrier.

Learn more: Allstate Insurance review

Grange Insurance Association

Grange Insurance Association specializes in coverage for homeowners in six states, including Oregon. With an average premium well below the state’s average, the company could be a good fit if you are primarily concerned with budget. As a mutual company, Grange Insurance Association is designed to serve its policyholders. Optional coverage includes water backup, recreational vehicle and farm liability.

Learn more: Grange Insurance review

State Farm

State Farm is the largest home insurance company in the country by market share. The coverage is fairly standard, but Oregon homeowners get access to a wide variety of online tools and resources, plus a mobile app. State Farm also offers generous discounts for more savings. The carrier partners with Ting to provide qualifying homeowners with a free device that monitors a home’s electrical system and can help identify problems before they start a fire.

Learn more: State Farm Insurance review

Travelers

Travelers has the cheapest average premium of any company on our list and also offers one of the longest lists of optional coverage. You may want to consider adding jewelry and valuable item coverage, identity fraud or green home coverage. You might be able to lower your premium even more by being claims-free, buying more than one type of policy from Travelers and having a home security system.

Learn more: Travelers Insurance review

USAA

USAA is not eligible for official ranking with J.D. Power because it only sells insurance to current and retired military members and their immediate families. However, the company consistently receives some of the highest scores in the industry for customer satisfaction and has below-average rates. If you qualify for coverage, your home insurance with USAA may also come with military-focused coverages like uniform coverage.

Learn more: USAA Insurance review

How much is homeowners insurance in Oregon?

The average cost of homeowners insurance in Oregon is $712 per year for a policy with $250,000 in dwelling coverage. In comparison, the U.S. national average annual rate for home insurance is $1,312 per year. Oregon homeowners pay far less than the national average.

Compared to the surrounding states, Oregon’s average premium is low. Homeowners in Washington pay $863 per year and in Idaho, the average annual premium is $835. California’s average annual home insurance premium is the highest of Oregon’s neighbors, at $1,014 per year. Oregon’s average premium may be less due to the state’s relatively low threat of weather damage.

Home insurance in Oregon

Some Oregon homes are at risk of fire, flood and earthquake damage, but the threat is not typically significant. However, Oregon homeowners may still want to purchase an insurance policy that will protect their property from potential hazards.

Common causes of loss in Oregon

Oregon may be a relatively safe place to live, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t still threats. Some of the most common causes of loss include:

  • Earthquake damage: Like the other West Coast states, Oregon may be at a higher risk for earthquake damage due to its proximity to the Cascadia Subduction Zone. A 9.0 magnitude earthquake or higher, and its resulting tsunami, are possible.
  • Landslides and mudslides: Due to the state’s wet climate, landslides and mudslides are relatively common. There may be a higher risk after an earthquake.
  • Fire: According to the Insurance Information Institute, Oregan ranks eighth in the nation for number of homes at risk for extreme fire damage. In 2020, 2,215 fires burned over 1.1 million acres of land in the state.

Knowing the common causes of damage in your area may help you decide what coverages are appropriate for your needs.

Home insurance coverage options in Oregon

In Oregon, most homeowners policies come with standard coverages, including dwelling, personal property, liability, medical payments and loss of use coverage. In addition, Oregon homeowners may want to consider purchasing optional coverage for more protection, such as:

  • Flood insurance: A standard homeowners insurance policy does not cover damage caused by floods. For that, you will need a flood insurance policy. A few companies also offer flood endorsements that you can add to your home insurance policy.
  • Earthquake insurance: Like floods, earthquakes are often not covered automatically on your home insurance policy. You can typically add this coverage by endorsement, but if you are in a high-risk area, you may need a separate earthquake insurance policy.
  • Identity theft coverage: With society becoming increasingly digital, identity theft is becoming more common. This endorsement can help pay for the costs associated with restoring your identity if it is stolen.
  • Debris removal coverage: Your homeowners insurance policy probably covers a base amount of debris removal coverage. However, increasing your limit may be a good idea, as this coverage helps to cover the costs of removing debris from your property after a covered claim.

Homeowners insurance can typically be personalized. You may be able to add optional coverage to tailor a policy to your unique situation. Working with a licensed insurance professional might help you choose the proper coverage for your circumstances.

Frequently asked questions

Is homeowners insurance required in Oregon?

No, homeowners insurance is not required by law in the state of Oregon, but if you have a mortgage or other type of home loan, your lender will likely require you to have a policy. Getting homeowners insurance can be a smart investment, even if it is not required. Having a policy in place can protect your finances if your home is damaged or destroyed.

How do I get homeowners insurance in Oregon?

One of the first steps in getting an Oregon home insurance policy is to get a quoteYou will need some basic personal information, like your address and birth date, as well as information about your home, such as the year it was built, the age of the roof and information about any unique or custom features. Having an idea of the coverage you want to purchase can be helpful, but an agent may also help you choose. Once you decide to proceed with a policy, your agent can let you know what steps to take. You may need to sign an application or make a payment.

How much home insurance do I need?

Deciding how much coverage to buy is an important part of the insurance process. If you have a home loan, you will likely be required to carry at least enough dwelling coverage to pay off your loan if the home is destroyed. Most insurance professionals recommend insuring your home to its full replacement value. You should also consider your liability coverage and how much you might need to protect your assets from guest injuries or damage to the property of others. Working with an insurance agent might help you choose appropriate coverage levels.

Methodology

Bankrate utilizes Quadrant Information Services to analyze 2021 rates for all ZIP codes and carriers in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. Quoted rates are based on 40-year-old male and female homeowners with a clean claim history, good credit and the following coverage limits:

  • Coverage A, Dwelling: $250,000
  • Coverage B, Other Structures: $25,000
  • Coverage C, Personal Property: $125,000
  • Coverage D, Loss of Use: $50,000
  • Coverage E, Liability: $300,000
  • Coverage F, Medical Payments: $1,000

The homeowners also have a $1,000 deductible and a separate wind and hail deductible (if required).

These are sample rates and should be used for comparative purposes only. Your quotes will differ.

Written by
Cate Deventer
Insurance Writer & Editor
Cate Deventer is a writer, editor and insurance professional with over a decade of experience in the insurance industry as a licensed insurance agent.
Edited by
Insurance Editor
Reviewed by
Assistant Vice President & Claims Field Manager