How I used my Ink Business Preferred card’s sign-up bonus

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When it comes to business credit cards with flexible rewards, it’s hard to beat the value proposition offered by the Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card. This is true for almost any business owner, but business owners who can spend a lot in this card’s bonus categories can do even better. After all, cardholders get the chance to earn 3X points on up to $150,000 spent each year on shipping purchases, internet, cable and phone purchases, select social media advertising and travel purchases (then 1X points).

Other reasons to love the Ink Business Preferred Credit Card include its reasonable $95 annual fee and the fact that new cardholders can earn 100,000 bonus points after spending $15,000 on purchases within three months of account opening. The fact you can redeem your rewards for travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards and get 25 percent more value when you do is also a major plus. So is the fact that you can pool your rewards from other Chase credit cards into one account.

These are just some of the reasons I have this card and use it for nearly all my business purchases throughout the year. If you’re looking for an example of how someone can utilize the bonus offer on this Chase business card, read on to learn about my favorite way to use Chase Ultimate Rewards points.

Details of the Chase Ink Business Preferred

  • Earn 100,000 bonus points when you spend $15,000 within three months of account opening
  • Earn 3X points on up to $150,000 spent each year on shipping purchases, internet, cable and phone purchases, select social media advertising and travel purchases (then 1X points), plus 1X points on all other purchases
  • $95 annual fee
  • Variable APR of 15.99 percent to 20.99 percent

How I used my Ink Business Preferred card’s sign-up bonus

I actually use a combination of cards known as the Chase trifecta for our personal and business spending. This collection includes the Ink Business Preferred Credit Card, as well as the Chase Freedom Unlimited and the Chase Sapphire Reserve.

Over the course of any given month, I use these cards to earn more bonus points in each one’s best categories. From there, I typically use my Chase rewards for any number of travel redemptions, including for hotels and excursions or activities through the Chase Ultimate Rewards portal.

However, I also use my Chase points for 1:1 transfers to Chase airline and hotel partners, which is what I did with the 100,000 bonus points I earned with the Ink Business Preferred. After I earned these 100,000 bonus points, I almost immediately transferred them to the Air France / Flying Blue frequent flyer program, which I frequently use to book inexpensive economy flights to Europe.

All told, the 100,000 bonus points I earned with this card paid for four one-way flights to Italy, although I did pay the expected airline taxes and fees, as well.

If you search the Air France website today, it’s easy to find similar redemptions to various locations throughout Europe. In addition to the fact you can find redemptions for less than 25,000 miles per person, one way, I also love that this program frequently lets me book four award flights at this rate.

Consider this example below, which shows award flights starting at 22,000 miles one-way (plus $66.70) from Chicago (ORD) to Paris (CDG) during the summer of 2022:

Or, consider a similar redemption from New York City (JFK) to Amsterdam (AMS) for 22,000 miles (plus $66.70).

Note that with these two example flights, the actual cost of these one-way tickets works out to slightly over $700 if you book a round-trip ticket. This represents a redemption value of more than 3 cents per point.

If you take the time to search the Air France portal, you can easily find numerous redemption opportunities just like these. That’s why I almost always transfer my Chase points to the Air France / Flying Blue program for flights to Europe, although I also use other transfer partners like United MileagePlus and Southwest Rapid Rewards.

Does Chase’s 5/24 rule apply to the Ink Business Preferred?

One interesting detail to note about the Ink Business Preferred is how Chase treats this card in relation to its infamous 5/24 rule. While personal credit cards all count toward the rule, many business credit cards from Chase don’t count against you when you apply for a new Chase credit card.

You do have to be compliant with the Chase 5/24 rule to be eligible for the Ink Business Preferred, meaning you have to have less than five new cards in the last 24 months to be considered. However, your Ink Business Preferred application won’t count against you when you apply for other Chase credit cards.

The bottom line

If you’re on the hunt for a business credit card for travel that offers a huge sign-up bonus, the Ink Business Preferred should be at the top of your list. Not only is the card’s welcome bonus worth $1,250 in travel booked through Chase Ultimate Rewards, but you can also transfer your points to popular airline and hotel partners at a 1:1 ratio and get outsized value that way, too.

Other reasons to get this business credit card include its reasonable $95 annual fee, the fact you get free employee cards, the lack of foreign transaction fees and Ink Business Preferred benefits. Those benefits include trip cancellation and interruption insurance, cellphone protection, primary auto rental coverage when you rent a car for business purposes and extended warranties.

With a huge sign-up bonus, flexible rewards and numerous cardholder perks and features, the Ink Business Preferred Card is worth it.

Written by
Holly D. Johnson
Author, Award-Winning Writer
Holly Johnson writes expert content on personal finance, credit cards, loyalty and insurance topics. In addition to writing for Bankrate and CreditCards.com, Johnson does ongoing work for clients that include CNN, Forbes Advisor, LendingTree, Time Magazine and more.
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