Auto insurance for high-risk drivers in Missouri

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Imparied driving due to drugs, prescription medicine or alcohol is up 49% in the last ten years and the cause of 20% of traffic fatalities in Missouri. High-risk driving that leads to serious accidents and fatalities aren’t limited to driving under the influence (DUIs). Speeding and reckless driving are also considered risky, dangerous behavior.

If your insurance carrier marks you as a high-risk driver, your premiums could skyrocket or you could even lose your coverage. You may have no choice but to purchase high risk auto insurance Missouri at a greater cost than average.

Rates for high-risk car insurance in Missouri

A number of factors that could classify you as a high-risk driver. Missouri high-risk auto insurance companies typically flag drivers as high risk if:

  • They have one or more speeding tickets
  • They were convicted of a DUI
  • They recently caused one or more accidents
  • They are teens or newly-licensed young adults

Some high-risk drivers face higher premiums than others depending on the violation. Take a closer look at how high risk car insurance Missouri rates can vary based on the factor.

Rates after a speeding ticket

While some car insurance companies only raise your premiums by a few percentage points after a speeding ticket, the average is a 20% to 40% increase. Speeding is considered a risky activity because it is often the cause of accidents. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that speeding has been responsible for roughly one-third of all traffic-related fatalities in the last 20 years.

The following table shows how much car insurance rates in Missouri could increase after a single speeding ticket. Multiple speeding tickets or serious infractions, such as racing or driving over 100 miles per hour could result in even higher increases.

Car insurance company Missouri average annual premium for full coverage before a speeding ticket Missouri average annual premium for full coverage after a speeding ticket % increase
AAA $2,011 $2,808 40%
Allstate $1,528 $2,545 67%
American Family $1,312 $1,804 37%
Electric Insurance Company $1,965 $2,624 34%
Farmers $1,320 $1,850 40%
Geico $1,713 $1,772 3%
Kemper $3,683 $4,634 26%
Missouri Farm Bureau $1,504 $1,580 5%
Progressive $1,386 $1,652 19%
Safe Auto $2,154 $2,541 18%
Shelter $1,923 $2,313 20%
USAA $988 $1,134 15%

Rates after an accident

Causing a car accident can be costly for your insurance carrier. It would be responsible for the bulk of the medical, legal and property damages you cause, so your insurance premiums will more than likely increase after an at-fault accident.

Car insurance company Missouri average annual premium for full coverage before an accident Missouri average annual premium for full coverage after an accident % increase
AAA $2,011 $2,873 43%
Allstate $1,528 $2,676 79%
American Family $1,312 $2,094 60%
Columbia $1,688 $1,891 9%
Electric Insurance Company $1,965 $2,588 32%
Farmers $1,320 $2,012 49%
Geico $1,713 $2,149 26%
Kemper $3,683 $4,937 44%
Missouri Farm Bureau $1,504 $1,636 9%
Progressive $1,386 $2,298 63%
Safe Auto $2,154 $2,893 40%
Shelter $1,923 $2,592 35%
State Farm $1,642 $1,745 6%
USAA $988 $1,289 32%

Rates after a DUI

Being charged with a Missouri DUI comes with long-term consequences. Your license will be suspended or revoked. First convictions typically result in a 90-day suspension, although more serious infractions could lead to one year without a driver’s license. You may also be required to obtain a certificate of financial responsibility (SR-22) from your insurance carrier to keep with you.

Some car insurance companies may cancel or choose to not renew your coverage. If they do continue to insure you, expect your rates to increase dramatically.

Car insurance company Missouri average annual premium for full coverage before a DUI Missouri average annual premium for full coverage after a DUI % increase
AAA $2,011 $2,808 40%
Allstate $1,528 $3,556 133%
American Family $1,312 $2,115 61%
Columbia $1,688 $2,736 62%
Electric Insurance Company $1,965 $5,081 159%
Farmers $1,320 $1,899 44%
Geico $1,713 $3,173 85%
Kemper $3,683 $4,032 9%
Missouri Farm Bureau $1,504 $1,861 24%
Progressive $1,386 $1,623 17%
Safe Auto $2,154 $3,013 40%
Shelter $1,923 $2,313 20%
State Farm $1,642 $1,983 21%
USAA $988 $1,677 70%

Rate for teen drivers

Teen drivers pay the highest insurance premiums of all age ranges. The reason coverage is more expensive is their lack of driving experience. As teens grow older, insurance rates tend to drop. In the meantime, picking the right provider could save a young driver money on car insurance.

Car insurance company Average annual premium for full coverage
AAA $3,621
Allstate $2,541
American Family $2,591
Columbia $2,514
Electric Insurance Company $317
Farmers $1,133
Geico $893
Kemper $7,903
Missouri Farm Bureau $2,553
Progressive $2,232
Safe Auto $3,015
Shelter $1,620
State Farm $2,309
USAA $1,461

*16 year old on their parent’s policy

Who is a high-risk driver?

Bankrate classifies high-risk drivers as any driver who pays higher insurance premiums due to factors such as age or driving behavior. This could include teens or drivers with multiple speeding tickets or accidents.

Insurance carriers classify a high risk driver as someone with a flawed driving record. State Farm explains that someone “convicted of driving under the influence (DUI) of drugs or alcohol or who have multiple violations such as speeding tickets may be considered a high risk driver, requiring special high risk auto insurance.”

How to lower your rate if you are a high-risk driver

As you could see, high-risk drivers pay significantly more for car insurance. You may be able to find savings on your vehicle coverage in a few ways:

  • Shop around for car insurance: If your premiums go up after an accident, conviction or citation, get quotes from several carriers to compare. You could find cheaper high risk auto insurance Missouri rates.
  • Complete a driver improvement course: If you pass an online defensive driving course approved by your carrier, you may earn a discount.
  • Enrolling in a provider’s usage-based program: Many insurance providers have driver-tracking programs that track your driving and reduce your premiums based on your driving habits.

Frequently asked questions

Why is car insurance more expensive after a speeding ticket?

Statistically speaking, speeding often causes accidents. Insurance companies may feel you are more likely to be at-fault in a crash if you tend to speed and classify you as high-risk.

Do I need an SR-22 in Missouri after a DUI?

Missouri generally requires drivers convicted of driving under the influence to obtain an SR-22 from your car insurance company.

Methodology

Bankrate utilizes Quadrant Information Services to analyze 2021 rates for all ZIP codes and carriers in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. Quoted rates are based on a 40-year-old male and female driver with a clean driving record, good credit and the following full coverage limits:

  • $100,000 bodily injury liability per person
  • $300,000 bodily injury liability per accident
  • $50,000 property damage liability per accident
  • $100,000 uninsured motorist bodily injury per person
  • $300,000 uninsured motorist bodily injury per accident
  • $500 collision deductible
  • $500 comprehensive deductible

To determine minimum coverage limits, Bankrate used minimum coverages that meet each state’s requirements. Our base profile drivers own a 2019 Toyota Camry, commute five days a week and drive 12,000 miles annually. These are sample rates and should only be used for comparative purposes.

High-risk drivers
Incident: Rates were calculated by evaluating our base profile with the following incidents applied: clean record (base), at-fault accident, single speeding ticket, single DUI conviction and lapse in coverage.

Written by
Cynthia Paez Bowman
Personal Finance Contributor
Cynthia Paez Bowman is a finance and business journalist who has been featured in Bankrate, Business Jet Traveler, MSN, CheatSheet.com, Freshome.com and TheSimpleDollar.com. She regularly travels to Africa and the Middle East to consult with women’s NGOs about small business development and works with select startups and women-owned businesses to provide growth and visibility.
Edited by
Loans Editor