Short-term car insurance in Arizona

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Short-term car insurance is a type of auto policy that remains active for six months or less. But Arizona car insurance companies do not specifically sell temporary car insurance policies. Depending on the provider, standard car insurance policies can only be purchased in six-month or 12-month increments.

You may find that some car insurance companies in Arizona advertise one-day, one-week or one-month policies. These types of insurance usually have very limited coverage and may not be the most suitable option for drivers in Arizona. However, there are several ways that Arizona drivers can get temporary auto insurance that meets their needs.

What is temporary auto insurance?

In most cases, the shortest car insurance policy you can get from a reputable Arizona auto insurance provider is six months in duration, at which point your policy is up for renewal. You can also choose a 12-month policy. Here are some of the main pros and cons of six-month vs. 12-month car insurance policies:

Pros and cons of short-term insurance in Arizona

6-month policies 12-month policies
Pros:
More opportunities to update your coverage
Pros:
Rate is locked in for the entire year
Cons:
Premium can change more frequently with accidents or traffic violations
Cons:
Fewer opportunities to update your coverage or change providers

Average cost of short-term car insurance

The table below indicates the average cost of car insurance in the United States and Arizona for a 12-month policy. Based on the annual premium, the average six-month policy rate in the United States is $837, and in Arizona, the average rate is $773. However, keep in mind that car insurance rates in Arizona are based on factors like your age, ZIP code, credit score and claim history.

National average annual cost for full coverage Arizona average annual cost for full coverage
$1,674 $1,547

Temporary car insurance options

If you want temporary car insurance in Arizona, you have several options. These policies can provide the coverage you need for a short period, depending on your situation. Keep in mind that the availability of these policies, including coverage and duration, will vary based on the provider.

Non-owner insurance policy

Non-owner insurance is one type of short-term car insurance in Arizona. It covers drivers who do not own a registered car but occasionally borrow vehicles from friends or family. Non-owner insurance only comes with liability insurance, so it will not cover the vehicle itself. It is typically sold in six-month increments and is usually much cheaper than purchasing a minimum coverage policy.

Rental car insurance

Rental car insurance only applies when driving a rental car. The policy takes effect the minute you drive off the lot and ends when you return the keys. Although most standard car insurance policies will cover rented vehicles, you can purchase insurance through the rental car agency if you only need temporary coverage.

Student driver insurance

Temporary auto insurance in Arizona might also be a good solution for student drivers. Because adding a teen driver to your car insurance policy causes your rate to increase, choosing a six-month policy allows you to update your coverage more frequently. For instance, if your student goes away to college for at least six months, you can remove them from the policy during that time and re-add them when they come home. Even if they are not away long enough to remove them from your car insurance policy, a six-month renewal may allow you to take advantage of a good-grades discount for your student sooner.

Short-term insurance for stored vehicles

You might benefit from short-term car insurance if you store a registered vehicle. In this case, your insurance company may let you drop full coverage while your vehicle is not in use, which saves you money. Just keep in mind that you will likely have to prove that you do not have easy access to the vehicle. There may also be storage requirements.

How to get short-term car insurance

There are advantages to having short-term car insurance, but it depends on your situation. For instance, if you are in the military, are planning to move to another state, are expecting to add a teen driver to your policy or are thinking about getting a new vehicle, it could make sense to get a six-month policy instead of a 12-month policy.

Before you purchase temporary car insurance in Arizona, you will want to shop around for providers that offer six-month policies. Then, get quotes from a few different providers for the type and amount of coverage you want.

As you shop for insurance, it is important to keep in mind that the cheapest car insurance companies are not always the best car insurance companies. The cheapest providers might have the lowest rates and best discounts, but they may not have the best coverage options for you. Consider what you value most in an insurance company before choosing one.

Methodology

Bankrate utilizes Quadrant Information Services to analyze 2021 rates for all ZIP codes and carriers in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. Quoted rates are based on a 40-year-old male and female driver with a clean driving record, good credit and the following full coverage limits:

  • $100,000 bodily injury liability per person
  • $300,000 bodily injury liability per accident
  • $50,000 property damage liability per accident
  • $100,000 uninsured motorist bodily injury per person
  • $300,000 uninsured motorist bodily injury per accident
  • $500 collision deductible
  • $500 comprehensive deductible

To determine minimum coverage limits, Bankrate used minimum coverage that meets each state’s requirements. Our base profile drivers own a 2019 Toyota Camry, commute five days a week and drive 12,000 miles annually.

These are sample rates and should only be used for comparative purposes.

Written by
Elizabeth Rivelli
Insurance Contributor
Elizabeth has two years of experience writing for insurance domains such as Bankrate.com, The Simple Dollar, Coverage.com and NextAdvisor, among others. In addition to auto insurance, Elizabeth regularly writes about home insurance, renters insurance and life insurance. She also covers industry trends and general insurance education.
Edited by
Insurance Editor