Americans feel that many aspects of their personal finances are in a better position now than they were 12 months ago, though they’re not as bullish as they were earlier this year, according to a monthly reading by Bankrate.

Bankrate’s Financial Security Index, which is driven by survey responses about job security, savings, debt and other financial issues, remained in positive territory in August.

The index declined for a 3rd month, however, to a reading of 101.2. Bankrate Chief Financial Analyst Greg McBride, CFA, noted that job security rebounded in August, though Americans were less optimistic about other components, including savings, debt, net worth and overall financial situation.

Princeton Survey Research Associates International conducts the national telephone survey. This month’s survey was conducted in English and Spanish from Aug. 6 to 9 with 1,000 adults living in the continental U.S. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.8 percentage points.

Highlights:

  • People between the ages of 30 and 49 were nearly twice as likely to say they were “saving more” than people between the ages of 50 and 64.
  • College grads were more than twice as likely to say they saved more than people who never attended college.
  • People who made $75,000 or more were just as likely to say they were “saving less” as people with salaries of under $30,000.

Highlights:

  • People nearing retirement (ages 50-64) were 3 times as likely to say “less secure” as people entering the workforce (ages 18-29).
  • Among people living in suburban areas, 29% said they were “more secure” today compared with 16% of people living in rural areas.
  • Hispanics were more than twice as likely to say they were “more secure” than whites.

Highlights:

  • Among people between 30 and 49 years of age, 23% said they felt “more comfortable” compared with 13% of those between 50 and 64.
  • Among Republicans, 37% said they were “less comfortable” compared with 25% of Democrats.
  • College grads were more than twice as likely to say they were “more comfortable” as people who never attended college.

Highlights:

  • Among women, 25% said they were “less comfortable” compared with 18% of men.
  • Among people living in urban areas, 27% said they were “less comfortable” with their debt, compared with 15% of people living in rural areas.
  • 31% of parents said they were “less comfortable” with their debt, compared with 17% of people who weren’t raising children.

Highlights:

  • Among men, 28% said their net worth was “higher” compared with 21% of women.
  • Among college grads, 37% said their net worth was “higher” compared with 17% of those who never attended college.
  • Among the highest wage earners ($75,000 or more), 42% said their net worth was “higher” compared with 15% of those who made less than $30,000 a year.

Highlights:

  • Among men, 28% said their financial situation is “better” today, compared with 21% of women.
  • More than a third of the youngest workers, ages 18 to 29, said their financial situation was “better” today.
  • Among Democrats, 27% said their financial situation was “better,” compared with 16% of Republicans.

What’s the status of your personal finances? Give yourself a checkup with a free credit score at myBankrate.

Editor’s note: Percentages may not equal 100, due to rounding.