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How long does a speeding ticket stay on your record?

Updated Jan 16, 2024
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Key takeaways

  • On average, drivers convicted of a speeding ticket see a 21 percent increase in their average annual car insurance premium.
  • Depending on your auto insurer, a speeding ticket impacts your car insurance rates for an average of three to five years.
  • You may be able to save on auto insurance by bundling policies, shopping around or taking an approved defensive driving course.

Having a speeding ticket on your driving record is one of the most common ways to end up with higher premiums. Speeding tickets are some of the most common infractions that drivers in the United States experience, and having one can lead to insurance companies perceiving you as a higher-risk driver. Luckily, this doesn't have to be the case permanently. If you're wondering how long a speeding ticket stays on your record, it will vary depending on your state and situation. But you can expect a speeding ticket to eventually disappear and your insurance premiums to improve, assuming you have an otherwise clean driving record.

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Speeding tickets and insurance premiums

All insurance rates — auto, life, homeowners, etc. — are evaluated for a potential policyholder on the basis of risk. When it comes to speeding tickets and auto insurance premiums, the insurance provider will typically evaluate driving records to determine what level of risk you may represent to insure.

Many drivers who receive a speeding ticket see an increase in insurance prices. Although the national average for drivers with a speeding ticket on record is $3,068 for full coverage according to data from Quadrant Information Services — a 21 percent increase — this can vary by provider.

Speeding is the most common traffic citation, but can also be a strong indicator that you may be more likely to be involved in an at-fault accident. This means you may be considered a higher risk for insurance companies to insure — which commonly affects rates, as providers often compensate for a greater likelihood of a claim payout.

Insurance companies will typically check your driving history when you apply for a policy and may also do so periodically after that. If you have received a speeding ticket, you can expect that your insurance provider will see the infraction.

If you’re wondering, “When will a speeding ticket show up on insurance,” the timeline will depend. Once you receive a speeding ticket, it may take a few days to several months to show up on your driving record, depending on your DMV and when your insurance renews. In some cases, you may be able to take an approved defensive driving course to prevent the ticket from being reflected on your record. However, if a speeding ticket does get listed on your driving record, your premium will likely go up. If you have too many speeding tickets within a short period of time, you may even be at risk for the company to drop your policy or deny renewal.

How long do speeding tickets stay on your record?

As for how long a speeding ticket stays on record for insurance, in many states, the average number of years that a speeding ticket stays on your driver’s license is around three years. The length of time may be more or less in certain states. For example, Virginia keeps speeding tickets on record for five years.

Obtaining a speeding ticket not only may impact your insurance premiums, but it may also affect other areas of your life as it comes with court fees, fines and driving school as well. If your speeding ticket is on your record for three years, finding the cheapest insurance policy may depend on comparison shopping and qualifying for discounts to offset premium increases.

Speeding tickets and your driver’s license

The Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) keeps track of traffic violations using a point system. Each state has its own rules and guidelines for the point system and the point threshold for citation severity (speeding in Virginia is considered a four point violation, for example). If you receive a speeding ticket, this will result in a certain number of points on your driving record and on your driver’s license. The number of points will sometimes depend on the speed over at which you were driving. In many states, the more you are in excess of the speed limit, the more points will show up on your driving record.

However, each state has its own point system and corresponding number of years that the points will stay on your driver’s license as well. As additional examples, in Florida, points for speeding will remain on your record for three years; in Arkansas, points will expire after five years; and in Nevada, points will only remain for one year.

Speeding tickets and your auto insurance

The amount of history an insurer looks at when determining your premium will vary by provider. Each insurance company handles traffic violations differently as well, as far as rates are concerned. While some may only track your driving record for the previous 3–5 years, others may look farther or consider only the most recent couple of years. This means that if you have an incident such as a speeding ticket on your record from three or four years ago, comparing quotes from car insurance companies may result in varying rates, depending on which providers will look back far enough to account for the speeding ticket.

The severity of your speeding ticket may also influence your insurance company when it is determining premiums. Your insurance company may evaluate your speeding ticket by a point system that is different from the DMV’s point system. Based on the number of points assigned to you dependent on the severity of your case, your insurer may determine if you are high-risk, and to what degree that will then impact your rates.

How to save on car insurance with a speeding ticket

Although rates generally increase after you receive a speeding ticket, you may still find multiple ways to save on auto insurance. Many insurance companies offer discounts that can help offset the increased costs of insurance after a speeding ticket. Here are a few ways to potentially see savings on car insurance if you are being impacted by a speeding ticket:

  • Defensive driving course - Take a defensive driving course. Many insurance companies offer a discount for drivers who take an approved defensive driving course or a driver’s education course.
  • Bundle - Many insurance companies that provide multiple policies, like home and auto policies, offer a bundle opportunity for insuring multiple policies with that carrier. For example, if you have a home and a vehicle, bundling the two insurance policies may help you save extra.
  • Look for good student discounts - If you are in school, having a GPA above 3.0 may make you eligible to save on insurance. Many insurance companies offer discounts specific to students — especially those with good grades.

Speeding tickets are the most common type of traffic violation, and having one on your record can have significant financial and practical impacts on your life. Depending on the state you live in and the amount you exceeded the speed limit, as well as the total number of points accumulated, it can take up to five or more years to get the points off of your driving record. Thankfully, insurers often offer discounts or savings opportunities that can potentially help regarding insurance costs associated with a speeding ticket.

Frequently asked questions

Written by
Mandy Sleight
Contributor, Personal Finance

Mandy Sleight has been a licensed insurance agent since 2005. She has three years of experience writing for insurance websites such as Bankrate, MoneyGeek and The Simple Dollar. Mandy writes about auto, homeowners, renters, life insurance, disability and supplemental insurance products.

Edited by Editor, Insurance
Reviewed by Director of corporate communications, Insurance Information Institute