In the week ahead (Feb. 13-20), 50 percent of the experts predict rates will rise, 10 percent say rates will fall, and 40 percent predict rates will remain relatively unchanged (plus or minus 2 basis points). Calculate your monthly payment using Bankrate’s mortgage calculator.

50% say rates will go up

Joel Naroff

Joel Naroff

President and Chief Economist, Naroff Economics, Holland, Pennsylvania

Up. Rates are reflecting a likely recession, which is not likely.

Greg McBride

Greg McBride, CFA

Senior vice president and chief financial analyst, Bankrate.com

The Fed is on hold, the economy is in good shape, and the coronavirus appears unlikely to have a material impact on the U.S. economy. With this backdrop, a slight upward drift in mortgage rates is likely.

Dick Lepre

Dick Lepre

Senior loan adviser, RPM Mortgage, Alamo, Calif.

The daily tech remains bearish (lower prices, higher yields) while the weekly remains bullish. This points to slightly higher Treasury yields and mortgage rates in the coming week. We should see some relief after this coming week when both tech are bullish (higher prices, lower yields.)

Natalie Campisi

Natalie Campisi

Mortgage reporter, Bankrate.com

Treasury yields are rising and concerns over the coronavirus are easing, so look for mortgage rates to edge up a bit in the coming week.

Jim Sahnger

Jim Sahnger

Mortgage planner, C2 Financial Corporation Jupiter, FL

Time and stocks continue to march on. Coronavirus fears have abated for the most part and the stock rally continues to impress at the expense of bonds. Economically speaking, the employment report as well as other data has been positive. Fed Chair Powell’s comments to Congress haven’t spooked anyone and aside from anything unforeseen, rates should tick higher. If you haven’t taken advantage of these great interest rates, don’t miss out.

10% say rates will go down

Robert A. Brusca

Robert A. Brusca

Chief Economist,
Fact and Opinion Economics, New York

Rates will drop.

40% say rates will remain the same

Elizabeth Rose

Elizabeth Rose

Certified mortgage planning specialist, AmCap Home Loans, Plano, Texas

And the beat goes on… Employment is strong, inflation is low. Stocks around the globe are getting a boost thanks to China signaling more stimulus to promote growth. It’s worth remembering that bonds are still trading at their best levels since last September. It doesn’t appear they will improve any from here in the near future. With strong support levels, I anticipate bonds will continue a sideways pattern and mortgage rates remain unchanged in the coming week. The outlier continues to be the coronavirus which could move the markets if things get worse.

Nancy Vanden Houton

Nancy Vanden Houten, CFA

Senior research analyst,
Stone and McCarthy Research Associates, New York

Rates will remain unchanged.

Mitch Ohlbaum

Mitch Ohlbaum

President, Macoy Capital Partners, Los Angeles

Unchanged, the 10 year is trading @ 1.628% and has barely moved in the last week. As I mentioned last week, stocks are climbing and any concerns about the coronavirus having a major impact on the global markets are waning. We are still waiting to get Q4 figures and the expectation is that they will be good, which would mean that the market was right and the Fed will need to lower rates as we move farther into 2020.

Les Parker

Les Parker

Managing director, Transformational Mortgage Solutions, Jacksonville, FL

Mortgage Rates standstill. Here’s a parody based on 2008, hit, “Circus” by Britney Spears. “All the eyes on BANKS in the center of the ring; Just like a circus.” Global markets live in a three-ring, Catch 22, circus. In the center, ring stands the G-4 central bankers desperately wanting to get the world out of its decline to nothingness with no pain. The medicine to avoid pain perpetuates low volatility and low economic activity.

About the Bankrate.com Rate Trend Index

Bankrate’s panel of experts is comprised of economists, mortgage bankers, mortgage brokers and other industry experts who provide residential first mortgages to consumers. Results from Bankrate.com’s Mortgage Rate Trend Index are released each Thursday.

Learn more about specific loan type rates
Loan Type Purchase Rates Refinance Rates
The table above links out to loan-specific content to help you learn more about rates by loan type.
30-Year Loan 30-Year Mortgage Rates 30-Year Refinance Rates
20-Year Loan 20-Year Mortgage Rates 20-Year Refinance Rates
15-Year Loan 15-Year Mortgage Rates 15-Year Refinance Rates
10-Year Loan 10-Year Mortgage Rates 10-Year Refinance Rates
FHA Loan FHA Mortgage Rates FHA Refinance Rates
VA Loan VA Mortgage Rates VA Refinance Rates
ARM Loan ARM Mortgage Rates ARM Refinance Rates