There are a ton of moving parts to deal with when you make a move to a new state. While updating your drivers license may not be at the top of your list, it’s important to handle it as soon as possible after moving from one state to another, and there are a few reasons for it. The first is that having a driver’s license that reflects your new address can be helpful with setting up services in your new state. Another reason is that all states have laws that require new residents to update their driver’s licenses within a certain time frame after their move.

Compare rates and save on auto insurance today!

Close X
Advertising Disclosure
This advertisement is powered by Coverage.com, LLC, a licensed insurance producer (NPN: 19966249) and a corporate affiliate of Bankrate. The offers and links that appear on this advertisement are from companies that compensate Coverage.com in different ways. The compensation received and other factors, such as your location, may impact what offers and links appear, and how, where and in what order they appear. While we seek to provide a wide range of offers, we do not include every product or service that may be available. Our goal is to keep information accurate and timely, but some information may not be current. Your actual offer from an advertiser may be different from the offer on this advertisement. All offers are subject to additional terms and conditions.

Compare auto insurance rates

Answer a few questions to see personalized rates from top carriers.
Caret DownCaret Up
Please select age
Location-Icon

Save on auto insurance with quotes from trusted providers like:

Progressive

Drivers switch & save an average of $750+/year

Liberty Mutual

Are you overpaying for auto insurance?

Allstate

Safe drivers choose Allstate®

Powered by Coverage.com (NPN: 19966249)
Insurance Disclosure

Coverage.com, LLC is a licensed insurance producer (NPN: 19966249). Coverage.com services are only available in states where it is licensed. Coverage.com may not offer insurance coverage in all states or scenarios. All insurance products are governed by the terms in the applicable insurance policy, and all related decisions (such as approval for coverage, premiums, commissions and fees) and policy obligations are the sole responsibility of the underwriting insurer. The information on this site does not modify any insurance policy terms in any way.

See more providers in
Choose from insurers in

In general, most states offer a grace period for switching your driver’s license, which can range from 10 days to three months on average. However, some states require you to change your license right away. As such, it’s important to know what your new state requires in terms of updating your drivers license to ensure that the process runs smoothly. You’ll also need to know where to go, and what documents you’ll need to provide, in order to get a new driver’s license. Here’s what you should know about how to update your driver’s license when you move to a new state.

Do I need a new driver’s license if I move?

It depends. If you’re staying within the same state, you will need to notify the DMV, or similar local department, of your new address. You will be issued a new license with your updated information. And if you move out of state, you will need to get an updated driver’s license from your new state of residence.

In-state move

If you are moving but stay within the same state, things are often a little easier. In this case, you may be able to update your driver’s license through your DMV’s online website. However, it’s not a guarantee and you may still have to visit a physical location. Even though this move is in-state, you will still need to update your auto insurance and information with the DMV.

Out-of-state move

If you’re moving between states, it’s essential to update your license as soon as possible. In general, your license needs to be issued from the state that you live in. Once your new address is confirmed, it’s a good idea to go ahead and update both your license and your insurance. Many states offer a grace period of between 10 and 60 days.

How do I get a new driver’s license?

The first step in getting a driver’s license in a new state is to locate where to go. Several different department types handle this, depending on the state. Best known may be the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV).

How to get a license in a new state

  1. Locate the government building for licenses (the local DMV).
  2. Learn which documents to bring. Call or check their website online.
  3. Gather the necessary documents.
  4. Go to the local DMV.
  5. Inform them why you’re there, show them your documents and fill out their forms.
  6. Pay any fees and take any test required.
  7. Receive your new license.

How do I find my DMV?

The DMV provides and tracks licenses, administers drivers’ tests and performs vehicle inspections. Some states use different government departments, though, such as the department of public safety or transportation. Below, you can see state-by-state which departments are used and how long you have after moving before you have to update your license.

State DMV website How long do I have to update my address if I moved in-state? How long do I have to get a new license if I just moved to this state?
Alabama Department of Public Safety 30 days 30 days
Alaska Division of Motor Vehicles Immediately 10 days
Arizona Department of Transportation 10 days Required Immediately
Arkansas Department of Motor Vehicles No limit 30 days
California Department of Motor Vehicles 10 days 10 days
Colorado Division of Motor Vehicles 30 days 30 days
Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles 2 days 60 days
Delaware Division of Motor Vehicles 30 days 30 days
Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles 30 days 60 days
Georgia Department of Driver Services 60 days 10 days
Hawaii Department of Transportation 30 days 30 days
Idaho Division of Motor Vehicles 30 days Varies
Illinois Office of the Secretary of State 30 days 90 days
Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles 30 days 90 days
Iowa Department of Transportation 30 days 60 days
Kansas Division of Motor Vehicles Immediately 90 days
Kentucky Driver Licensing Division 10 days 90 days
Louisiana Office of Motor Vehicles 10 days 30 days
Maine Bureau of Motor Vehicles 10 days 30 days
Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration 30 days 30 days
Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles 30 days 60 days
Michigan Office of the Secretary of State Immediately 30 days
Minnesota Division of Driver and Vehicle Services 30 days Required Immediately
Mississippi Department of Public Safety 30 days 60 days
Missouri Missouri Department of Revenue Immediately 60 days
Montana Department of Justice’s Motor Vehicle Division 10 days 30 days
Nebraska Department of Motor Vehicles 60 days 60 days
Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles 30 days 30 days
New Hampshire Division of Motor Vehicles 30 days 30 days
New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission 7 days 60 days
New Mexico Motor Vehicle Division 10 days 60 days
New York Department of Motor Vehicles 10 days Required Immediately
North Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles 60 days 30 days
North Dakota Department of Transportation 10 days 60 days
Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles No limit 60 days
Oklahoma Department of Public Safety 10 days 30 days
Oregon Department of Motor Vehicles 30 days No limit
Pennsylvania Department of Transportation 15 days 30 days
Rhode Island Division of Motor Vehicles 10 days 60 days
South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles 10 days 30 days
South Dakota Department of Public Safety No limit 90 days
Tennessee Driver Services Division 10 days 90 days
Texas Department of Public Safety 30 days 30 days
Utah Department of Public Safety 10 days 90 days
Vermont Office of the Secretary of State 30 days 60 days
Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles 30 days 60 days
Washington Department of Licensing 10 days 60 days
Washington, D.C. Department of Motor Vehicles 60 days 30 days
West Virginia Division of Motor Vehicles 20 days 30 days
Wisconsin Division of Motor Vehicles 10 days 60 days
Wyoming Department of Transportation 10 days Required Immediately

What should I expect if I’m getting a new license?

Depending on the state you’ve moved to, you may need to take different tests when replacing your license. Tests you might encounter include basic vision tests, written tests over the rules and procedures of driving and potentially a full driving test. In some states, you can find sample versions of the written test online. There are often some fees associated with replacing a license and with taking some of these tests.

Do I need to update my car insurance?

It’s essential to keep your auto insurance updated, whether moving within a state or between states. To update your insurance, contact your agent with your new address. They may ask you for a proof of residence document for this process.

Frequently asked questions

    • It depends. In some states, you could get a ticket if you haven’t gotten a new driver’s license within the state’s allotted time. This could result in a fine for the first offense, but it depends on the situation. In some cases, you may be handed more severe penalties for not updating your driver’s license.
    • It depends. If you’re not a permanent resident of the state you’re attending college in, you should be fine with your out-of-state driver’s license. College students are typically considered residents of the state that they graduated from, and often return to their homes after semesters are over and during holiday breaks. However, if you fully move to your college state and become a permanent resident, you will likely need to update your license.
    • It’s recommended to update your auto insurance before your license, as you may need to show proof of insurance when updating your license. In that case, your insurance will need to reflect the new address that you are updating on your license.