Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card vs. Capital One® SavorOne® Cash Rewards Credit Card

5 min read

For those who love to dine out or enjoy a recreational weekend getaway, Capital One’s Savor card pairing both offer a sign-up bonus and generous cash-back rewards. But when it comes to credit cards that have a nearly equal counterpart, the question becomes, “Which card will earn more?” The Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card and Capital One® SavorOne® Cash Rewards Credit Card differ in the sign-up bonus and annual fee. After that, the two cards are very similar.

Card comparison overview

 Features Capital One Savor Capital One SavorOne
Welcome bonus Earn a $300 bonus after spending $3,000 within your first three months. Earn a $150 bonus after spending $500 within your first three months.
Rewards rate Earn unlimited 4% cash back dining and entertainment purchases, 2% cash back at grocery stores and 1% cash back on all other purchases. Plus, earn 8% cash back on tickets at Vivid Seats through May 2020. Earn unlimited 3% cash back on dining and entertainment, 2% cash back at grocery stores and 1% cash back on all other purchases.
Introductory APR N/A Zero percent intro APR for 15 months from account opening on purchases and balance transfers, then a variable APR of 15.49 – 25.49% thereafter.
Annual fee $0 intro for the first year, then $95. $0

Capital One Savor Cash Rewards Credit Card vs. Capital One SavorOne Cash Rewards Credit Card highlights

While both cards cater to foodies and entertainment seekers, Savor and SavorOne have a couple of differences that can make or break the bank depending on how you spend, especially after the first year when the Savor’s annual fee kicks in.

Sign-up bonus: Capital One Savor

Savor is the winner here. Spend $3,000 on purchases in the first three months of account opening to earn $300 cash. The SavorOne’s sign-up bonus of $150 after spending $500 on purchases in the first three months of account opening is easier to score for light spenders, though.

Rewards rate: Capital One Savor

Savor is again the winner with a 4 percent cash back rewards rate for qualified dining and entertainment purchases. You’ll also get 2 percent at grocery stores and 1 percent for all other purchases. SavorOne gives you 3 percent for dining and entertainment, then the same 2 percent at grocery stores and 1 percent for all other purchases.

Annual fee: Capital One SavorOne

SavorOne takes the top spot this time with no annual fee. Although waived the first year, Savor comes with a $95 annual fee.

Introductory APR offer: Capital One SavorOne

SavorOne is the winner, with a zero percent introductory APR for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers for a 3 percent fee. After that, all purchases have a variable rate of 15.49 – 25.49 percent based on creditworthiness. Savor has a slightly higher interest rate of 15.99 – 24.99 percent variable on all purchases and transfers, based on creditworthiness, immediately upon account opening.

Foreign transaction fee: Tie

Both the Savor and SavorOne offer no foreign transaction fees, so you can use either card on your dining and entertainment purchases abroad without taking on extra charges.

Which card earns the most cash back?

Heavy spender on dining and entertainment? Savor will get you more cash with both the 4 percent rewards rate on dining and entertainment and the sign-up bonus. But if you dine out occasionally, or catch a concert just a few times a year, the SavorOne is probably a better option for you. The 3 percent earn per transaction for the same categories is still a good rate, and you won’t have to worry about an annual fee.

Capital One Savor vs. SavorOne Rewards spending example

Let’s say you spend a total of $3,000 on dining and entertainment purchases, $4,000 for groceries and $1,300 on all other purchases annually.

With Savor, you could earn $120 cash back on dining and entertainment, $80 in cash rewards at grocery stores and $13 on your additional spending for a total $213 cash back. Plus, if you spend $3,000 within the first three months of opening your account, you’ll earn an extra $300, which could boost your first year total (with the waived annual fee) to $513.

Using the same annual spending amounts for the SavorOne, you would earn $90 back on dining and entertainment, $80 on groceries and $13 on your other purchases with the card for an annual $183. And if you spend $500 in the first three months of account opening, you will earn an extra $150 bonus, bringing your total for the first year in this example to $333.

After the first year, you’ll also have to account for the Savor’s $95 annual fee, and make sure your spending in the dining and entertainment category is enough to make up the difference between the two.

Why should you get the Capital One Savor?

If you dine out at restaurants and spend on entertainment often, then Savor is for you but there is a $95 annual fee after the first year. If you know you can spend enough on qualified categories to get rewarded in cash back to make up for the fee then this card is worth keeping.

To make Savor worth it in your second year of owning the card, you would need to spend at least $2500 annually in the dining and entertainment category to make $100 in cash rewards.

But remember, you’ll also earn 2 percent at grocery stores and 1 percent on all other purchases. For another example, $5,000 in qualified annual grocery spending alone will cover your annual fee in the second year.

Additional benefits

Through May 2020, Savor cardholders can earn 8 percent cash back on all Vivid Seats purchases. Vivid Seats is where you can buy and sell tickets to sports, concerts and theater events.

Redemption options

With Savor, you have four options to redeem rewards: statement credit, a check in the mail, a credit for your previous purchases or a gift card.

Recommended credit score

To get the Savor card, you’ll need good to excellent credit (generally between 670-850). Capital One also requires you to have never declared bankruptcy, been more than 60 days late on a payment in the past year or had a loan or credit card for three or more years with a limit above $5,000.

Why should you get the Capital One SavorOne?

Just because you don’t spend much on restaurants and concerts, you don’t have to miss out. The SavorOne card gets you 3 percent on dining and entertainment categories. Plus, you still earn 2 percent at grocery stores and 1 percent on everything else and don’t have to worry about an annual fee.

Additional benefits

SavorOne card members have access to Premium Access Reservations through the OpenTable app where you can make online reservations at participating restaurants. This is also a bonus of the Savor card, though.

Redemption options

Unsurprisingly, the redemption options for the SavorOne are the same as the Savor. You can choose from statement credit, a check in the mail, credit for previous purchases or gift cards.

Recommended credit score

Again, the SavorOne has the same credit score qualifications as the Savor — a good to excellent credit score between 670-850. Capital One’s same stipulations also apply here.

Why not both?

These cards’ rewards structures are very similar, so adding both to your wallet would create redundant rewards. Plus, Capital One limits sign-up bonuses to new cardholders so you wouldn’t be able to redeem two bonuses. Another thing to remember is that too many hard inquiries can damage your credit report.

If you can spend $3,000 within three months to make the sign-up bonus deadline to earn $300, then start with the Savor card. Take advantage of the sign up bonus and 4 percent categories during the first year while there’s no annual fee. Then, if you find you’re not maximizing value with the Savor, evaluate whether you should transfer to SavorOne your second year.

Bottom line

Savor is best for cardholders who dine out and spend on entertainment often, while the SavorOne is better for those who don’t spend as much and want to avoid an annual fee or for someone who has a debt balance to transfer. Either way, both cards offer excellent cash back opportunities and flexible redemption options. For now, we’ll call this one a tie.