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The 10 best personal finance books of 2022

Various books on shelves
Kai Schwabe/Getty Images
Various books on shelves
Kai Schwabe/Getty Images

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If you’re looking for a practical book for your summer reading, Bankrate’s list of the best personal finance books for 2022 offer insightful and trustworthy expertise on what to do with your money.

‘The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America’s Wealthy,’ by Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko

Whom this book is best for:

Anyone who wants to learn from the financial behavior of millionaires.

Why the book made Bankrate’s list:

Being rich doesn’t mean being flashy. In fact, it’s the opposite. “The Millionaire Next Door” reveals that many affluent individuals shy away from buying the most expensive cars and taking the most over-the-top vacations, opting instead for a disciplined approach to their money. It turns out that being a millionaire relies more on being thrifty.

‘How to Make Your Money Last: The Indispensable Retirement Guide,’ by Jane Bryant Quinn

Whom this book is best for:

Retirees looking to build wealth through solid investment advice.

Why the book made Bankate’s list:

If you have questions about how to sustain your investments through your retirement, “How to Make Your Money Last” has the answers. With thoughtful details on ways to supplement income from Social Security, investments and more, Quinn shows how to create a recurring paycheck that will have you living comfortably through retirement.

‘A Random Walk Down Wall Street: The Time-Tested Strategy for Successful Investing,’ by Burton G. Malkiel

Whom this book is best for:

Anyone (specifically business students) who wants to understand how the stock market works.

Why the book made Bankrate’s list:

If you’re new to investing, “A Random Walk Down Wall Street” lays out a solid blueprint for success. Malkiel goes into detail on a variety of investing strategies including smart beta investing (which combines the benefits of passive investing and the advantages of active investing strategies) and finding opportunities in emerging markets. In the process, the reader gains an understanding of the complex world of investing.

‘The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing,’ by Benjamin Graham

Whom this book is best for:

Readers who want a deeper understanding of the risks and rewards of investing.

Why the book made Bankrate’s list:

”The Intelligent Investor” is the gold standard of investing, teaching the importance of value investing, which enables investors to develop long-term strategies. And with updated insight from financial reporter Jason Zweig, readers will gain an understanding of long-term values and how they can incorporate them into the current financial landscape.

‘Bunny Money (Max and Ruby),’ by Rosemary Wells

Whom this book is best for:

Children looking to learn the basics of personal finance.

Why the book made Bankrate’s list:

The story in this children’s book is about bunnies Max and Ruby who are trying to buy their grandma a gift for her birthday. As they set out, they encounter a series of adventures that deplete their money supply. In the process, children discover how their decisions impact the money they have.

‘Spend Well, Live Rich: How to Get What You Want with the Money You Have,’ by Michelle Singletary

Whom this book is best for:

Readers who want practical advice on how to manage their money.

Why the book made Bankrate’s list:

Singletary chronicles the “7 Money Mantras for a Richer Life” she learned from her grandmother. These mantras may be simple in nature, but they provide a firm foundation for anyone hoping to strengthen financial behavior. The book differentiates between wants and needs and why you should sweat the small stuff.

‘Broke Millennial: Stop Scraping By and Get Your Financial Life Together,’ by Erin Lowry

Whom this book is best for:

Millennials who want to understand the basics of money management and how to avoid common financial errors.

Why the book made Bankrate’s list:

Lowry creates a blueprint millennials (ages 26-41) can use to go from living from paycheck to paycheck to achieving financial goals. She delves into the thought process behind making financial decisions, such as, “Do you treat your money like a Tinder date or a marriage?” By providing applicable insight and relatable stories, Lowry gives those in their 20s, 30s and early 40s the basics they need to make better money decisions.

‘Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties,’ by Beth Kobliner

Whom this book is best for:

Those in their 20s and 30s seeking guidance on managing their finances.

Why this book made Bankrate’s list:

“Get a Financial Life” covers all aspects of personal finance from how to file taxes and investing, to strategies for improving your credit scores. Kobliner creates a guide that encompasses every aspect of your financial life, with practical suggestions for achieving financial goals.

‘When She Makes More: 10 Rules for Breadwinning Women,’ by Farnoosh Torabi

Whom this book is best for:

Female breadwinners looking to balance the health of their relationships and finances.

Why this book made Bankrate’s list:

Torabi tackles a relevant topic to today’s social and financial climate: An increasing number of wives are making more money than their husbands. In 2020, women made more than their male partners in 29.9 percent of marriages, according to the Census Bureau. Twenty years earlier, the percentage was more than 6 percentage points lower (23.3 percent). In “When She Makes More,” Torabi highlights that there are significant financial but also psychological effects the changing role of the breadwinner has on those in committed relationships. Her advice is directed at women to make the most of their financial circumstances and keep their relationships healthy, but it can help men to understand relationship dynamics as well when their partner is the breadwinner.

‘Simple Wealth: The Practical Guide to Transform Your Relationship with Money and Live in Abundance,’ by Holly Morphew

Whom this book is best for:

Consumers looking to have more confidence in their financial decisions.

Why this book made Bankrate’s list:

Making a change in your financial life means making a change in your personal life, too. “Simple Wealth” shows how personal life decisions and financial decisions go hand in hand, providing practical advice in terms that are easy to grasp. Morphew, a financial counselor, breaks down not only how to escape the “shame cycle of money,” but also how to make affirmative moves toward financial independence and success.

Written by
Sean Jackson
Contributing Writer
Sean Jackson is a contributing writer at Bankrate. Sean writes about budgeting, saving money and more.
Edited by
Wealth editor