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How to contact your credit card issuer

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Few people enjoy calling customer service, but sometimes a quick phone call is the fastest way to get the results you need. Plus, some issues can’t be addressed through your online bank account or credit card app.

That said, we all know that customer service calls aren’t always quick or easy—which is why it’s a good idea to prepare for your call before you contact your credit card issuer. The more information you bring to the conversation, the more likely you are to get the answers you’re looking for.

Let’s take a closer look at how to contact your card issuer, as well as what you should do beforehand to ensure you get the most out of your call.

How do you contact your credit card issuer?

There are two primary ways to contact your credit card issuer. The easiest way to get in touch is by calling the phone number on the back of your credit card.

You can also visit your card issuer’s website to look up their customer service options. Some credit card issuers offer different customer service numbers for people experiencing various issues. Many credit card issuers even let users send social media messages to dedicated customer service accounts.

Call the number on the back of your credit card

If you’re looking for a quick and easy way to contact your card issuer, call the phone number on the back of your credit card. This customer service number will connect you to the card issuer’s primary customer service hub, with a phone tree or voice-recognition interface to help you select the purpose of your call.

You can use the number on the back of your credit card to check a balance or payment status, report fraud, speak to a representative and more.

Find the customer service information online

Credit card issuers put their contact information online, and many issuers offer more than one method of contacting customer service. So, visit your credit card issuer’s website or log in to your online account or app to learn what kind of customer service options are available.

For example, if you have a Chase credit card, you can use the self-service options or contact customer support. Chase Customer Service is available at 1-800-935-9935.

You can also send Chase a message on social media, such as on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram. If you decide to go this route, you should never include your credit card number or personal information in the message.

You can also use Chase’s resource hub to find answers to frequently asked questions and solutions to common issues. If you find the answer to your question, this could save you the trouble of contacting customer service in the first place.

Customer service contact information by credit card issuer

Want fast, easy access to credit card customer service? Here’s the customer service information for seven major credit card issuers:

Card issuer Online contact information Customer service number Social media accounts
American Express American Express Customer Service 1-800-528-4800 @AskAmex (Twitter)
Bank of America Bank of America Customer Service 1-800-732-9194 @BofA_Help (Twitter)
Capital One Capital One Support Center 1-800-227-4825 @AskCapitalOne (Twitter)
Chase Chase Customer Service 1-800-935-9935 @ChaseSupport (Twitter)
Citi Citibank Customer Service 1-800-950-5114 @AskCiti (Twitter)
Discover Discover Card Help Center 1-800-347-2683 @Discover (Twitter)
Wells Fargo Wells Fargo Credit Card Help 1-800-642-4720 @Ask_WellsFargo (Twitter)

Remember: If you contact your credit card issuer on social media, don’t include your credit card number or personal information in the message. If you’re sending screenshots of the issue you’re experiencing, make sure no sensitive information is visible.

When should you contact your credit card issuer?

There are many good reasons to contact your credit card issuer. Maybe you want to request an increase in your credit limit or report a suspicious charge.

Here are some of the most common situations in which you might want to contact your credit card issuer:

However, there doesn’t necessarily need to be a problem to reach out to your credit card issuer. You can also contact customer service for basic questions, like balance information or your next payment due date. You should also be able to find that information by logging in to your online account or app.

How can you prepare for the call?

If you plan to contact your credit card issuer, make sure you come to the call prepared. Have your card number ready, and be prepared to give the last four digits of your Social Security number.

If you plan to report a suspicious charge or initiate a chargeback, make sure you have the information at hand. For instance, customer service will want to know when the questionable payment was made and the amount.

And if you plan to ask for a credit limit increase or a lower interest rate, have information available that will help you state your case. For instance, can you prove that your income recently went up? Or can you highlight your positive credit history?

Credit card issuers are more likely to grant these kinds of requests to people who regularly make on-time payments and manage their credit accounts responsibly.

If you need to contact your card issuer about hardship programs or debt-relief options, be prepared to discuss your current financial situation. Let your card issuer know that you want to work together to find a solution that allows you to remain current on your accounts and avoid damaging your credit score.

And if you’re ready to discuss debt settlement, be prepared for your credit score to drop.

The bottom line

Today, credit card issuers make it easy for you to get in touch, from calling customer service to sending messages on social media. There are many good reasons to contact your credit card issuer, from reporting a problem to requesting a lower interest rate.

To get the best results, make sure to prepare for the call in advance. Planning ahead will help you have an informed, efficient conversation that is more likely to result in your desired outcome.

Written by
Nicole Dieker
Personal Finance Contributor
Nicole Dieker has been a full-time freelance writer since 2012—and a personal finance enthusiast since 2004, when she graduated from college and, looking for financial guidance, found a battered copy of Your Money or Your Life at the public library. In addition to writing for Bankrate, her work has appeared on CreditCards.com, Vox, Lifehacker, Popular Science, The Penny Hoarder, The Simple Dollar and NBC News. Dieker spent five years as writer and editor for The Billfold, a personal finance blog where people had honest conversations about money. Dieker also teaches writing, freelancing and publishing classes and works one-on-one with authors as a developmental editor and copyeditor.
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