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The U.S. Bank Cash+™ Visa Signature® Card and the Chase Freedom® will help you earn cash back on rotating bonus categories and everyday purchases. The distinction lies in what type of spending you’d like to earn rewards on, as well as the cap on those rewards.

Both cards offer high cash back percentages based on rotating quarterly bonus categories with caps on the earning potential for each quarter. Let’s take a look at the breakdown:

U.S. Bank Cash+ Visa Signature Card vs. Chase Freedom

Cards Cash+ Visa Signature Card Chase Freedom
Annual fee $0 $0
Welcome bonus  $150 bonus after you spend $500 in eligible net purchases within the first 90 days of account opening $150 bonus after you spend $500 on purchases in your first 3 months from account opening
Rewards 5% cash back on your first $2,000 in combined eligible net purchases each quarter on two categories you choose

Unlimited 2% back on one everyday category, like gas stations or grocery stores

Unlimited 1% back on all other purchases

5% cash back on up to $1,500 quarterly in combined purchases in bonus categories (activation required)

Unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases, automatically

Introductory offer 0% intro APR for 12 billing cycles on balances transferred within 60 days from account opening (15.99% – 25.49% variable thereafter) 0% intro APR for 15 months from account opening on purchases and balance transfers (16.99% – 25.74% variable thereafter)
Balance transfer fee 3% of the transferred balance ($5 minimum) $5 or 3% of the amount of transfer within first 60 days, whichever is greater. After that, $5 or 5% of each transfer, whichever is greater

Here are the details:

Cash+ Visa Signature Card

With the Cash+ Visa Signature Card, get 5% cash back on your first $2,000 in combined eligible net purchases each quarter on two categories of your choosing. You can pick from the following categories:

  • Ground transportation
  • Select clothing stores
  • Cellphones
  • Electronics stores
  • TV, internet and streaming services
  • Gyms/fitness centers
  • Home utilities
  • Fast food
  • Sporting goods stores
  • Department stores
  • Furniture stores
  • Movie theaters

You’ll also earn 2% cash back on purchases in categories like grocery stores and gas stations, along with 1% back on all other purchases.

In order to earn 5% and 2% cash back in the categories of your choosing, you must remember to activate each quarter. To do so, call the number on the back of your Cash+ Visa Signature Card or visit usbank.com/cashplus. You can do so up until five days before the end of the quarter.

There’s also a $150 cash bonus when you spend $500 in eligible net purchases within your first 90 days of account opening. You won’t be charged an annual fee, and there’s an introductory 0% APR for your first 12 billing cycles for balance transfers made within 60 days of account opening (15.99% to 25.49% variable APR thereafter).

Read the full U.S. Bank Cash+ Visa Signature review here.

Chase Freedom

The Chase Freedom will help you earn 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in purchases each quarter, plus 1% cash back on everything else automatically.

You must activate each quarter to be enrolled in the 5% bonus categories. The 2019 Cash Back calendar is as follows:

  • Jan. – March: Gas stations, tolls, drugstores
  • April – June: Grocery stores, home improvement stores
  • July – Sept.: Gas stations, select streaming services
  • Oct. – Dec.: Coming soon

You’ll earn a $150 cash back bonus when you spend $500 in your first three months from account opening. Redeem your cash back rewards for gift cards, travel or by shopping with points on Amazon.com.

This card doesn’t charge an annual fee. There’s also a 0% introductory APR offer for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers (16.99%–25.74% variable APR thereafter).

Read the full Chase Freedom review here.

Which card is right for you?

If you’re interested in tracking and maxing out rotating bonus categories to earn cash back, either card is a decent choice.

We’ve broken out how much you can earn by maxing out the bonus categories of each card, along with a balance transfer example to show you how to best utilize the low introductory APR offers.

First and second-year value example

Cards Cash+ Visa Signature Card Chase Freedom
Best for Flexible cash back rewards Rotating cash back categories
Spending example $2,000 * 4 quarters * 5% * $0.01 = $400

$500 * 12 months * 2% * $0.01 = $120

$200 * 12 months * 1% * $0.01 = $24

$1,500 * 4 quarters * 5% * $0.01 = $300

$1,000 * 12 months * 1% * $0.01 = $120

Welcome bonus $150 bonus after you apply online and spend $500 in eligible net purchases within the first 90 days of account opening $150 in cash back if you spend at least $500 within the first three months of card ownership
First-year value $694 (including sign-up bonus)  $570 (including sign-up bonus)
Second-year value  $544 $420

Cash+ Visa Signature Card

By spending $2,000 per quarter (therefore maxing out the bonus category), you’d earn $400 in cash back for the year. If you spend an additional $500 a month in the 2% category and $200 in the 1% category, you’d earn a total of $544 in cash back for the year.

When adding in the welcome bonus, you’d end up with $694 in cash back rewards the end of your first year.

Chase Freedom

With the Chase Freedom, you’d max out the 5% bonus category by spending $1,500 each quarter, earning you $300 cash back for the year. By spending an additional $1,000 a month in the 1% category, you’d earn an additional $120.

When you include the $150 welcome bonus, your first-year cash back rewards value equals $570.

In summary

Whichever card you go with, both offer no annual fee, an unlimited 1% cash back category and a $150 cash back bonus when you meet the minimum spending requirements.

The Cash+ Visa Signature Card offers a higher cap on its 5% cash back category compared to the Chase Freedom, as well as an unlimited 2% cash back category.

Seeing as the Chase Freedom doesn’t have a 2% category, there’s more to offer in terms of rewards when it comes to the Cash+ Visa Signature Card.

Balance transfer example

With the Cash+ Visa Signature Card, you get an introductory 0% APR for 12 billing cycles on balance transfers made within your first 60 days. There’s also a 3% balance transfer fee. After the intro period ends, there is a 15.99% – 25.49% variable APR.

Say you owe $1,500, for example, and transferred the debt to your Cash+ Visa Signature Card. You could then pay $125 a month without acquiring interest fees. Keep in mind you’d also owe a $45 balance transfer fee.

With the Chase Freedom, you get a slightly longer introductory 0% APR offer of 15 months (then 16.99% – 25.74% variable APR). If you instead took your $1,500 and transferred it to the Chase Freedom, you could pay $100 a month without acquiring any interest. There’s also a balance transfer fee of $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater, with the Chase Freedom, meaning you’d owe an additional $75.

Bottom line

Choose Cash+ Visa Signature if …

… you want a card that has more to offer in terms of rewards. It boasts a slightly higher cap on its 5% cash back category, as well as an unlimited 2% cash back category.

Choose Chase Freedom if …

… you’re most interested in transferring a balance. The Chase Freedom has a longer 0% introductory APR period on balance transfers. This will allow you to pay off your debt in smaller amounts without racking up interest fees.

Check out our other credit card comparisons.


Stay up-to-date with the industry’s top news and strategies for earning cash back. Check out Bankrate’s cash back catalog for everything you need to know to earn the most out of every swipe.

Editorial disclosure: All reviews are prepared by Bankrate.com staff. Opinions expressed therein are solely those of the reviewer and have not been reviewed or approved by any advertiser. The information, including card rates and fees, presented in the review is accurate as of the date of the review. Check the data at the top of this page and the bank’s website for the most current information.