mortgage

Mortgage Rate Trend Index

 
 

Will rates go up, down or remain unchanged?

Polyana da CostaPolyana da Costa
Mortgage reporter, Bankrate.com
Rates have been declining for more than two months, but now Treasury yields are increasing and the stock market seems to be getting better. I think we'll see some adjustment this week.
Holden LewisHolden Lewis
Assistant managing editor, Bankrate.com
My track record on these rate predictions isn't as good as I would like it to be. But two things are for sure: Mortgage rates are attractive right now, and they eventually will rise. The prudent play is to lock instead of float.
Greg McBrideGreg McBride
Senior financial analyst, Bankrate.com
Economic momentum is slowing, but inflation isn't going away, even with lower commodity prices. Core inflation was up more than expected and that will give mortgage rates a little boost.
Derek EgebergDerek Egeberg
Certified Mortgage Planning Specialist and branch manager, Academy Mortgage, Yuma, Ariz.
With continued comments in regard to the Federal Reserve stopping QE2 and the debt ceiling issue now facing the U.S. government, rates have begun to climb higher.
David KuiperDavid Kuiper
Mortgage planner, First Place Bank, Holland, Mich.
Wow! What a week of volatility in the bond market and for mortgage interest rates. We got spoiled there with a couple of weeks of near-low levels for mortgage interest rates, but recent hints of inflation (the archenemy of bonds) have come to light, overseas and domestically. This has led to a slight rise in mortgage rates. If you're buying, building or refinancing in the near future, it would be prudent to lock and take advantage of the incredible interest rate environment we find ourselves in today.
Dick LepreDick Lepre
Senior loan officer, RPM Mortgage, San Francisco
The short-term tech is bearish and we should see another week to two weeks of technically induced higher Treasury yields and slightly higher mortgage rates. Do not despair. This should be followed by another excursion below 3 percent on the 10-year yield. My thinking is that just how far we get below 3 percent will have little to do with the U.S. economy and a lot to do with coming to terms with the fact that some of this eurozone sovereign debt is going to default. The uglier that is, the lower will be U.S Treasury yields.
Joe NunziataJoe Nunziata
Chairman and co-CEO, FBC Mortgage, Orlando, Fla.
With inflation fears top of mind, I feel that we will see rates tick up in the coming weeks. I would recommend that customers look to lock in as opposed to floating their rate.
John WalshJohn Walsh
President, Total Mortgage Services, Milford, Conn.
We are in a period of high volatility for the markets as we approach the end of the Federal Reserve's program of purchasing U.S. Treasuries. I expect mortgage rates to rise in the coming week as the Fed clarifies that no further stimulus is forthcoming unless economic conditions materially worsen.
Tommy XintarisTommy Xintaris
Senior mortgage consultant, Houston
Mortgage bonds have had a great two-month run, but I believe this is where it begins to pull back. MBS securities are in oversold positions and the risk far outweighs the reward at this point so I'd advise anyone buying/refinancing to lock in as soon as possible.
 
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