5 reasons to refinance your mortgage | Hero Images/Getty Images

Rates are still near all-time lows, which means mortgage refinancing remains a good deal for many.

Yes, you can save money by doing a simple refinance in which you swap a lower rate for your existing higher rate. But that’s just one way — and one reason — to refinance a home loan.

Best ways to refinance your home loan

Check out today’s best mortgage refinance rates.

Rate and term mortgage refinance

Rate and term refinances are the most common form of refinancing. When you get a rate and term refinance, you replace your mortgage with a loan sporting a lower interest rate, and for roughly the same term. The term is the payoff period: A 30-year mortgage has a 30-year term.

Shop today for a mortgage refi.

Cash-out refinance

Cash-out refis were popular during the housing boom and contributed to the bust. When you get a cash-out refi, you borrow more money than the outstanding mortgage balance and you receive the difference in cash.

For example, you might have borrowed $225,000 a few years ago for your home, and you’ve been making payments faithfully and now owe $200,000. Meanwhile, your home’s value has swelled and can be appraised at $300,000. In this case, you can refinance for more than $200,000. In fact, you can borrow up to $240,000 without having to pay for mortgage insurance.

During the boom, a guy on my street got several cash-out refinances. At least one was a subprime loan. He ended up owing much more than he originally paid for the house. Eventually, he couldn’t afford the payments, forfeited the house and moved out of state.

There are responsible ways to use a cash-out refi. You can use the money to pay off high-interest debt. Or you could use it for a home improvement: a swimming pool or solar panels.

Refinance to shorten the term

You got a 30-year mortgage three or five years ago, and you want to refinance. You don’t have to start over with a 30-year repayment period. You can ask to pay it off in a shorter time than that — 27 years, 25 years, 20 years or 15 years. Your choice.

If your preferred payoff period is more than 20 years, you’ll probably have to get a 30-year mortgage and ask the lender to amortize it over your preferred, shorter period. Most lenders offer 15-year mortgages, which generally have lower interest rates than 30-year loans. A few lenders offer 20-year mortgages with slightly lower rates.

Cash-in refinance

Yes, in addition to the cash-out refinance, there’s such a thing as the cash-in refi. This happens when you have some money lying around and you spend it to pay off part of the old mortgage. Then the new, refinanced loan is for less than the old loan.

Cash-in refinances used to be more popular. But in today’s low-interest environment, any spare cash would best be used to invest in something with a higher return than your mortgage interest rate.

Divorces can force a variety of the cash-in refi, in which one former spouse pays off a portion of the outstanding loan balance and the remaining spouse refinances the loan in her or his own name.

Refinance to get rid of mortgage insurance

You made a down payment of less than 20 percent, and you’ve been saddled with mortgage insurance payments, aka PMI, as a result. But in the years since you got the mortgage, you paid down some of the debt and, more important, the value of your house went up a lot. If the outstanding loan amount is less than 80 percent of the home’s appraised value, you might be able to refinance into a loan without private mortgage insurance.

This can be an especially valuable tactic if you have a mortgage insured by the Federal Housing Administration — also known as an FHA loan. With modern-day FHA loans, you can’t cancel the mortgage insurance — even when your loan-to-value ratio falls below 80 percent. The way to get rid of FHA mortgage insurance payments is to refinance (or to sell the house).

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