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MyFICO now offers Experian score

By Janna Herron · Bankrate.com
Friday, June 28, 2013
Posted: 3 pm ET

Americans can now get their FICO credit score based on their Experian credit report at FICO's consumer education website, myFICO.com.

Previously, myFICO.com only offered credit scores from credit bureaus TransUnion and Equifax. FICO scores based on Experian credit reports have not been available since 2009, according to myFICO.com spokesman Anthony Sprauve.

While they might be available, the credit scores aren't free. Consumers can get their credit scores for $19.95 a piece, or pay $49.85 for all three.

That may be too much for the price, says John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education at SmartCredit.com.

"There are so many free alternatives in the market that I'm not sure paying anyone for a credit score is a wise investment these days," he says.

The credit scores consumers get from myFICO.com probably aren't the same ones lenders use, another reason to hold off on paying for the scores. Some lenders use industry-specific FICO credit scores that are tailored for credit card issuers or auto lenders. Others use older generations of the FICO credit score. In total, there are 53 different FICO credit scores.

The better idea for consumers is to pull their free credit reports every 12 months from the three major credit bureaus at AnnualCreditReport.com. That way, they can see the information their credit scores are based on and correct any errors that may be hurting their credit.

Will you be pulling your Experian-based FICO credit score?

Follow me on Twitter: @JannaHerron

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3 Comments
Hmm
August 22, 2013 at 7:06 pm

A lot of banks seem to use the fico. I don't see why it would hurt to do the free trial and cancel within the 10 days once a year.