savings

5 ways to grow an emergency fund

Avoid financial ruin
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Avoid financial ruin | Stephen Zeigler/Getty Images

Avoid financial ruin

Financial surprises shouldn't make you nervous. You have an emergency fund in a savings account, right?

If not, it's not too late to boost your savings.

"By nature, unplanned expenses are unexpected, so the sooner you're prepared the better off you'll be when the inevitable happens," says Bankrate.com's chief financial analyst Greg McBride, CFA.

Avoid letting unexpected expenses or events lead you to financial ruin. Build your emergency fund by following these tips.

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Determine how much you need | iStock.com

Determine how much you need

Start building your emergency fund with a specific goal in mind. While your savings goal will depend on your income and expenses, a general rule of thumb is to save enough to cover four to seven months' worth of expenses.

Kevin Gallegos, vice president of Phoenix operations for Freedom Debt Relief, says that when setting your savings goal, you should focus on having enough to cover expenses, not on replacing your entire income.

"Remember, in an emergency, we don't fund vacations, fancy new clothes, dining out or other luxuries," he says.

While you may aim higher eventually, make small goals at first, such as saving $1,000 and working your way up to a reserve to cover several months' worth of expenses.


Decide where you will keep the fund | iStock.com

Decide where you will keep the fund

Your emergency fund should be easily accessible, but not so easily accessible that you'll be tempted to make withdrawals for everyday spending.

"I like using an account away from my normal checking account to build a psychological wall between my spending habits and my emergency fund," says Ray Lucia, a nationally syndicated radio host.

Online banks are good locations for your emergency savings account because you can't just walk into the bank and withdraw your cash. Consider keeping emergency funds in a combination of locations, including an online savings account, money market account and short-term CDs.


Treat it like a bill | iStock.com

Treat it like a bill

Establish a monthly savings goal and make it part of your regular budget. Consider setting up an automatic monthly transfer, just as you would with the electric bill or fitness club membership, to ensure the money is saved each month.

Paying yourself first through a direct deposit from your paycheck into your emergency account will help you build that fund steadily. But make sure you've created a balanced budget so that you save the appropriate amount. Otherwise, you'll be pulling money out of savings regularly to pay bills, defeating the purpose.


Use it only for emergencies | iStock.com

Use it only for emergencies

An emergency fund should be used only for expenses you can't foresee -- events such as getting laid off from a job or a major appliance breaking.

One of the most common problems people have with emergency funds is forgetting to plan for one-time expenses each year, Coghill says.

"People budget to save and put away (for) an emergency fund, then they forget to budget for an annual insurance expense or car expenses, etc.," she says. "You can foresee your car insurance expense next November, for example, so it is not an emergency."


Take it slow | Vince Talotta/Getty Images

Take it slow

Gallegos recommends setting your expectations at a realistic level. "Any action you can take to establish an emergency fund will do you good," he says. "If you transfer $10 to a savings account each week, you'll have $500 in a year."

Don't be afraid to start with a small amount of savings each month, but try to increase it whenever possible. Open a savings account and start building your emergency fund.

When you get a tax refund or commission check, add it to your fund, he says. And gradually boost your savings by selling items you don't need, holding a yard sale or putting change into a jar every evening.

"Save rather than blow your excess money," Gallegos says. "By stashing the extra, in addition to your regular predetermined amount from your budget, you'll see your savings soar."

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