retirement

6 surprising IRA investment options

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Cross the property line
Cross the property line | Juan Silva/Getty Images

Cross the property line

Buying real estate directly with your IRA is tricky. You'll need enough money in your account to cover all expenses: maintenance, taxes, etc. There's no commingling of non-IRA funds with your IRA investment.

Many IRA administrators won't handle real estate. Finding lenders to help with the purchase has historically been challenging, because any mortgage must be nonrecourse. That is, you and your IRA are off-limits to the lender.

Another important caveat: Buying property for personal use is prohibited with a traditional IRA. There's an exception. You may withdraw $10,000 from an IRA for a home purchase if you qualify as a first-time homebuyer. You'll owe tax on the income, but you won't pay a penalty.

But in general, you lose many tax advantages of real estate investing by using an IRA.

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