When unemployed, there are several different possibilities for your next move toward a job, but how do you know which is right for you? Exploring these options is as simple as clicking on a thought bubble.

Marry a KardashianTake anything and keep lookingHold out for your dream jobGo back to school

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Marry a KardashianTake anything and keep lookingGo back to school

Hold out for your dream job

“If I had tons of money, I might totally concentrate on my dream job,” says Karen Burns, author of “The Amazing Adventure of Working Girl,” who has had 59 jobs over 40 years in 22 cities and in foreign countries. “But I wouldn’t go into debt or become indigent to do it.”

Is it risky?

Way risky, dude. Unemployment’s at 13.1 percent for ages 20 to 24 and 9.6 percent for ages 25 to 29, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The longer you’re out of work, the larger that gaping hole on your resume will be. “If you hold out, there is a possibility that you won’t get a job at all, and it just becomes increasingly harder to get a job because you’re out for longer and longer and longer,” says Vicky Oliver, career coach and author of “301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions.”

What’s the upside?

You’ll have more time to find a great fit, and your unsullied resume will scream dedication and perseverance once you land an interview. Who knows — it might even spark a bidding war.

“Say you had another job offer. You could say, ‘This other place has offered me a pretty good job, but I really want to work for you. What do you recommend?'” says Oliver. “Even if they say ‘Take the job,’ at least it gives you a reason to stay in touch with them.”

What will my friends think?

Get lots of input. “Peer pressure can be hugely powerful, especially when you’re in your 20s,” says Burns.

“Seek input not just from friends but from mentors, professors and older people as well. Then it’s easier to balance it all out and figure out the best path for you.”

How will I know if I made the wrong decision?

You’ll feel frustrated. “If you’ve identified the baby steps between you and that dream job and you look at that list and you haven’t even done steps one and two, then you’re not moving forward,” says Burns. “That’s a sign that it’s not working.”

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Marry a KardashianTake anything and keep lookingHold out for your dream job

Go back to school

“If you’re really undecided, then school is probably a good place for you,” says Vicky Oliver, career coach and author of “301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions.” “If you’re entering a field that takes multiple degrees, you’re better off getting one or two of those out of the way now — if you have the money.”

Is it risky?

It depends. Will you make more with a second or advanced degree? Or will you then be overqualified for an entry-level position in your field? And can you handle the added student debt?

“Going into debt hugely limits your possibilities,” says Karen Burns, author of “The Amazing Adventure of Working Girl.” “And a lot of employers check credit ratings these days.”

What’s the upside?

A few academic papers and an extra degree under your belt may help get you in the door and hired at a better salary. A second related degree may give you the edge over one-degree applicants.

“Having more education is rarely a bad thing,” says Nicholas Aretakis, career coach and author of “No More Ramen: The 20-Something’s Real World Survival Guide.”

“If you are pursuing a field in which you’ll need further education, what better time to do it than when you’ve just come out of school?”

What will my friends think?

Carefully consider the source. “You don’t want your friends to be your sole feedback, and they’re just kind of validating what you want to hear. That’s a choice that a lot of people make, but that’s not always in your best interest,” says Aretakis.

“Sometimes you need to pursue trusted mentors — counselors, professors, older relatives — who have the proper experience to give you good counsel.”

How will I know if I made the wrong decision?

You’ll feel stuck. “If you were committed financially to a program and the job market started to ease, you could feel restricted from taking that job, or it might place you in a precarious position with the financial responsibility for education you would not now pursue,” says Aretakis.

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Marry a KardashianGo back to schoolHold out for your dream job

Take anything, and keep looking

“Your best chance of landing a job is when you have a job. You’re marketable,” says Nicholas Aretakis, career coach and author of “No More Ramen: The 20-Something’s Real World Survival Guide.” “You want to be working toward building credentials or skill sets to position you for that dream job when it surfaces. And it will surface.”

Is that risky?

Not as risky as homelessness. And you’ll be in good company: An estimated 18.5 percent of the work force is underemployed, according to a 2011 Gallup poll.

“I think the only risk is one’s energy level,” says Vicky Oliver, career coach and author of “301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions.” “It’s hard to look for a job while you’re working. The risk is that you run out of energy for it; you get sucked into the vortex of some job that you’re not crazy about, but it’s easier.”

What’s the upside?

It’s easier to land a job when you have a job. “You’d be greatly (limiting) yourself by not getting out there and networking with people, meeting new contacts and establishing references,” says Aretakis.

If possible, strive for a job where you’ll be learning and developing skills that will help you eventually get a better job, Aretakis says.

What will my friends think?

Does it really matter? “You might think, ‘Oh, everyone thinks I’m an idiot for taking a job at Wendy’s,’ but that’s probably wrong,” says Karen Burns, author of “The Amazing Adventure of Working Girl.”

“They’re busy thinking about themselves mainly. Once you realize that, it’s tremendously freeing.”

How will I know if I made the wrong decision?

You’ll lose interest — fast. “If you don’t feel like you’re learning something or you’re not making the money you need, those would be tip-offs,” says Oliver.

“If you learned everything in the 40-minute orientation and you haven’t learned anything more in three years, then you’re in a bad job. If you feel like your brain is kind of corroding? That makes it a bad job.”

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Take anything and keep lookingGo back to schoolHold out for your dream job




(Kim, Rob and Kourtney Kardashian) – Source: PR Photos

Is that risky?

Maybe to your pride. And it might only be seasonal work.

What’s the upside?

Wait here while I get you Bruce Jenner’s phone number …

What will my friends think?

What in the world are you still doing with friends?

How will I know if I made the wrong decision?

See that luggage at the curb? That’s yours.

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