Tips for boosting your credit score

While exact percentages will vary depending on your credit profile, "try to get the usage on all of them at 20 (percent) to 30 percent instead of a bunch at zero and one at 80 percent," Chung says. "You're not spending less, you're just spreading it across different cards."

This strategy, of course, should accompany efforts to ultimately pay all of your existing debt down.

If you're really into finessing the system, check your credit report to see what day of the month your creditors send updates on payments to the credit bureaus, Chung says. They're rarely on the same cycle as your payment due date. That's why you can pay off your card every month and your credit report will show you carrying a balance. Then, make your payments several days before the reporting date.

All of these strategies generally take at least 30 days because lenders don't report payments more than once a month.

Rapid rescoring

If you're in the throes of qualifying for a mortgage and need a score boost in a hurry, you can speed the process along with rapid rescoring. If you have legitimate negative information on your credit report, such as late payments or accounts in collections, you're out of luck. But the process of rapid rescoring can help increase your score within a few days by correcting errors or paying off account balances.

You can't do this one yourself; you'll need a lender who is a customer of a rapid rescoring service. Generally, the service will run roughly $50 for every account on your credit report that needs to be addressed, but it could save you thousands on your loan.

If a consumer can find a lender who is a customer of a rapid rescoring service, new information can be posted within 72 hours, Scott says.

Some nifty online tools are available to find out which strategies could have the most impact on your score. Fair Isaac's site offers a credit score simulator when you purchase a credit report or a credit score. It offers seven simulated scenarios, such as how paying down your account balances -- or not paying any of your bills on time this month -- would affect your score.

CreditXpert's "What-If" simulator lets you play with several variables, such as buying a car, paying off a student loan and opening a department store account, all at the same time.

The bottom line is that you're not powerless when it comes to your credit score.

"There are a lot of things you can do to improve your score," Chung says. "You need to understand what your credit is like now and what's influencing your score today. Then you can take an objective look at the different options available."


Editorial Disclaimer: The editorial content is not provided or commissioned by the credit card issuers. Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of the credit card issuers, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the credit card issuers.

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