College finance

Recent college finance stories

Yes, those thousands of dollars spent on tuition seem absurd, but here's where it all goes.
When in college, a private loan to cover extra costs seems like a good idea. But watch out.
Here's a crash course in student loans if grad school will be your first time taking on debt.
Fewer students will qualify for grant money, and federal student loans will get more expensive.
With tuition bills and loan defaults on the rise, more students wonder if college is worth it.
If a family changes states, the old one may still be used for the kids' prepaid tuition accounts.
Reduce the risk of student loan default by landing a job before you even finish college.
Older adults might have an advantage over traditional college students in getting college aid.
A family living in Rome half of the year can use several college savings vehicles in the U.S.
A hybrid payment product lets student IDs double as prepaid cards. Here's what to know.
Finding college financing takes time and research. Use this guide to get the most help.
Bogged down by college debt? A financial aid guru weighs in on loan consolidation.
Age isn't a barrier when it comes to financial aid for college, if you know where to look.
Want to keep your earnings from being taxed on a 529 plan distribution? Here's what to know.
Scholarships abound for students with interests in everything from sheep to duct tape fashions.
Ex-spouses can open separate college savings plans for a child. Here's how to iron out the details.
Don't pay full price when you're a student. From laptops to new clothes, student discounts abound.
College savings plans can work for and against you. Get the most out of yours.
College is pricey. Get schooled in these creative cost-cutting strategies.
Your investment can be protected if your scholar withdraws from college, but consider the caveats.
With college paid by the GI Bill, direct your 529 to trim debt unless tax issues arise.
High school seniors should start lining up financial aid now. This timeline can keep you on track.
Weigh the pros and cons of using a cash value life insurance policy over a 529 plan.
While most states assume the risk of prepaid plans, they're not risk-free for families.
You can pay off a student loan with a college savings plan, but it may be a taxing matter.
With their generous gifts, relatives may unwittingly negate a grad's financial aid.
There are instances where you can file for aid without parents, but they're slim and grim.
Will your 529 plan cover college? If you're not sure, look for new ways to pay for school.
Your high school kids can enhance their college financial aid chances with these tasks.
There are fees attached to college savings plans, but these charges might sneak by you.
With tuition prices increasing, a private consultant could get you more college cash -- or not.
There are many benefits to getting a college degree. Here's how to be debt-free and educated.
Do some homework before determining the best tax-advantaged college savings plan.
Some private student loans allow a co-signer to be removed under certain conditions.
Convert your 529 assets to less-risky choices as your child gets older.
A 529 plan doesn't fit everyone. Here are some alternatives when it's not the best option.
The IRS has specific rules about when to withdraw from a 529 for college expenses.
Using an IRA to pay for college could trigger taxes, but you can avoid a penalty.
Coverdells have some advantages over 529 plans. Find out whether they could work for you.
The 529 account isn't limited to undergraduate expenses, if you follow the rules.
Prepaid college plans can trump college savings plans, but there are limitations.
Many states are cutting 529 plan fees. It might be time to look at changing plans.
Parents are not eligible for the education tax exclusion unless one fact is true about their child.
What is the best way to save for college? The answer differs from family to family.
Rules that went into effect this summer change the college financing picture for the better.
A jobless father wonders how he'll pay off $70,000 in school loans for his children.
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Steve R. Bucci (debt)college
Transferring a grandparent's 529 plan to the parents can help them in several ways. Find out how.
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