Compare our best 60% LTV mortgages

You can get a 60% LTV mortgage with a 40% deposit. The best 60% LTV mortgages are cheaper than mortgages with a higher LTV (loan to value). Use this page to compare our best 60% LTV mortgage deals. Explore the guide to learn more about 60% LTV mortgages and how to get one.

Mortgage type

Property price

£

Mortgage amount

£

Mortgage term

years

Initial rate type

Deal length

Repayment type

Our best 60% LTV mortgage rates

  • The Mortgage Works 1 Year Fixed mortgage

    Initial rate 1%. APRC 4.7%. Set-up fees £3,600
  • Progressive Building Society 2 Year Variable mortgage

    Initial rate 1.05%. APRC 3.83%. Set-up fees £0
  • Nationwide Building Society 2 Year Fixed mortgage

    Initial rate 1.09%. APRC 3.2%. Set-up fees £1,499
  • Barclays 2 Year Fixed mortgage

    Initial rate 1.09%. APRC 3.3%. Set-up fees £999
  • Nationwide Building Society 2 Year Fixed mortgage

    Initial rate 1.09%. APRC 3.2%. Set-up fees £999
  • Lloyds Bank 2 Year Fixed mortgage

    Initial rate 1.09%. APRC 3.5%. Set-up fees £1,499
  • Santander 2 Year Fixed mortgage

    Initial rate 1.12%. APRC 2.9%. Set-up fees £1,499
  • Cumberland 2 Year Variable mortgage

    Initial rate 1.13%. APRC 3.8%. Set-up fees £1,999
  • We've found 2219 mortgage deals

    The Mortgage Works

    1 Year Fixed

    Initial rate

    1%

    until 31-08-2021

    APRC

    4.7%

    overall cost for comparison

    Set-up fees

    £3,600

    Monthly payment

    £678.37

    for 12 months

    Progressive Building Society

    2 Year Variable

    Initial rate

    1.05%

    APRC

    3.83%

    overall cost for comparison

    Set-up fees

    £0

    Monthly payment

    £682.45

    for 24 months

    Nationwide Building Society

    2 Year Fixed

    Initial rate

    1.09%

    APRC

    3.2%

    overall cost for comparison

    Set-up fees

    £1,499

    Monthly payment

    £685.73

    for 24 months

    Barclays

    2 Year Fixed

    Initial rate

    1.09%

    until 31-07-2022

    APRC

    3.3%

    overall cost for comparison

    Set-up fees

    £999

    Monthly payment

    £685.73

    for 24 months

    Nationwide Building Society

    2 Year Fixed

    Initial rate

    1.09%

    APRC

    3.2%

    overall cost for comparison

    Set-up fees

    £1,499

    Monthly payment

    £685.73

    for 24 months

    Nationwide Building Society

    2 Year Fixed

    Initial rate

    1.09%

    APRC

    3.2%

    overall cost for comparison

    Set-up fees

    £999

    Monthly payment

    £685.73

    for 24 months

    Lloyds Bank

    2 Year Fixed

    Initial rate

    1.09%

    until 31-08-2022

    APRC

    3.5%

    overall cost for comparison

    Set-up fees

    £1,499

    Monthly payment

    £685.73

    for 24 months

    Santander

    2 Year Fixed

    Initial rate

    1.12%

    until 02-10-2022

    APRC

    2.9%

    overall cost for comparison

    Set-up fees

    £1,499

    Monthly payment

    £688.19

    for 24 months

    Santander

    2 Year Fixed

    Initial rate

    1.12%

    until 02-10-2022

    APRC

    2.9%

    overall cost for comparison

    Set-up fees

    £1,499

    Monthly payment

    £688.19

    for 24 months

    Cumberland

    2 Year Variable

    Initial rate

    1.13%

    APRC

    3.8%

    overall cost for comparison

    Set-up fees

    £1,999

    Monthly payment

    £689.02

    for 24 months

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    Representative example:

    If you borrowed £200,000 payable over 25 years, with an initial fixed-rate for two years at 4.79%, your monthly payments would be £1,144.84 for 24 months. This would then revert to a standard variable rate (SVR) of 4.24% for the remaining 23 years, costing £1,086.24 per month for 276 months. Overall cost for comparison is 4.5% APRC representative. The total amount payable over the full term would be £328,272, including product fee of £995 and interest of £127,277.

    Your home may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

    What is a 60% LTV mortgage?

    The cheapest and best mortgage you can get is a 60% LTV (loan to value) mortgage. By putting down a deposit of 40%, mortgage lenders will see you as a very safe bet – and thus offer you the best interest rates and promotional periods.

    For example, if you want to buy a property valued at £300,000, you'd need a deposit of £120,000 to get a 60% LTV mortgage.

    Another option, if you're moving house or remortgaging, is to have a large amount of positive equity in your current property. For example, if your home is worth £400,000, and you owe £240,000 on your mortgage, then you have £160,000 in equity that could help you secure a new 60% LTV mortgage.

    What is home equity?

    The other big source of home equity is an increase in property value. Over the past 20 years, UK house prices have exploded – which means a lot of people have a relatively small mortgage for a very valuable home. If you have a mortgage of £150,000 and the value of your home has increased to £250,000, you would have an equity of £100,000 or 40% – enough to secure a 60% LTV with very low interest rates.

    How to get a 60% LTV mortgage

    If you have a large amount of equity in your home, or you have a huge amount of money in savings, you may be able to afford a 60% LTV mortgage.

    There are two main reasons for getting a 60% LTV mortgage: you’re selling your home and moving somewhere else, or you’re staying put but want a better mortgage rate. To get a 60% LTV mortgage, start by comparing 60% LTV mortgage rates, and then you might consider talking to a mortgage broker to see if they can find you a better deal.

    If you’re lucky enough to have a lot of equity or a large amount of savings, another option to consider is remortgaging to borrow more money from the bank – and then using that money to renovate or extend your home. Mortgages – especially at 60% or 65% LTV – are one of the cheapest ways of borrowing money.

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    Last updated: 3 July, 2019