Coonhound running in water
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It’s hard to put a price on something as loyal and loving as a dog, but the reality is that canines aren’t cheap. You need to budget your life in order to make room for the cost of raising your four-legged friend. Fortunately for dog lovers, there are several cheap dog breeds that can help fill your home with joy.

This article highlights the 5 cheapest dogs to buy based on extensive research across over 300 breeds. We reviewed cheap small dog breeds as well as their larger-sized cousins and took everything into account including:

  • Cost of a puppy
  • Grooming
  • Potential health issues and treatments
  • Annual pet care costs (food, recurring medical visits, toys, licenses, etc.)

So, without further ado, let’s take a look at our top picks for cheapest dog breeds!

Otterhound running
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5. Otterhound

Average puppy price: $550
Estimated grooming costs: $100
Possible health concerns:

Potential minimum health costs: $4,700
Annual pet care costs: $750
Total for first year: $6,100

True to its name, the Otterhound was bred to hunt otters. Members of the breed are exceptional swimmers with sturdy builds, but the real distinguishing characteristic is that shaggy coat. Their waterproof coat allows them to take to the water as naturally as their prey and, as a result, the Otterhound’s grooming costs are higher than all the other dogs on this list. Despite this, the greatest expense will be the potential medical costs associated with the breed’s health issues. Still, the Otterhound squeaks by into the #5 spot for cheapest dog breeds.

Black and tan coonhound playing catch
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4. Black and Tan Coonhound

Average puppy price: $350
Estimated grooming costs: $60
Possible health concerns:

  • Hip dysplasia
  • Cataracts
  • Thyroid issues

Potential minimum health costs: $4,630
Annual pet care costs: $750
Total for first year: $5,790

The Black and Tan Coonhound is large and in charge with males standing over 20 inches tall at the shoulder. Able to cross great distances with its large legs, the Black and Tan loves to run but can be as much of a couch potato as any other hound dog. As is common with most large dogs, the Black and Tan can suffer from hip dysplasia so you’ll need to be vigilant and make sure your dog gets plenty of exercise. On the plus side, its short coat makes grooming a breeze and helps earn the Black and Tan Coonhound the #4 spot in our list of top cheap dog breeds.

Pointer dog
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3. Pointer

Average puppy price: $450
Estimated grooming costs: $45
Possible health concerns:

  • Hip dysplasia
  • Visual impairment
  • Gastric torsion

Potential minimum health costs: $4,240
Annual pet care costs: $624
Total for first year: $5,359

When reviewing the cheapest dogs to buy, we were surprised to see such a strong showing by the Pointer. So named for its talent to pursue and point out its prey, the Pointer is an MVP in the world of sporty hunting dogs. The average cost of a puppy from this breed combined with the lower grooming costs make the Pointer an easy choice for this list. And while the breed has been known to exhibit similar afflictions to our previous entrants, its status as a medium-sized makes the annual pet care costs considerably lower.

 

Blue tick Coonhound
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2. Bluetick Coonhound

Average puppy price: $550
Estimated grooming costs: $50
Possible health concerns:

  • Gastric torsion
  • Ear infections

Potential minimum health costs: $2,650
Annual pet care costs: $750
Total for first year: $4,000

Next up on our list of the cheapest dog breeds is the Bluetick Coonhound. Despite what you might think from the name, the Bluetick Coonhound gets its name from the mottled (or “ticked”) pattern coat. Though the Bluetick is a large-sized dog (with the associated large-sized costs), it’s a cheaper breed than its cousins. This is because the Bluetick is considered a healthier breed with fewer potential health concerns to worry about.

 

Harrier dogs hunting
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1. Harrier

Average puppy price: $350
Estimated grooming costs: $35
Possible health concerns:

  • Hip dysplasia

Potential minimum health costs: $1,700
Annual pet care costs: $624
Total for first year: $2,709

You could be forgiven for mistaking this outgoing, people-loving dog for a Beagle. While the Harrier shares much in common with a Beagle, it is far larger. In all our research on cheap dog breeds, the Harrier rose to the top for having fewer potential health concerns and a low-maintenance coat. It’s also pretty darn cute to boot!

 

Puppies playing
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Putting a price on man’s best friend

It’s important to remember that taking on a dog is a lot of work and a major investment in time and money. The worst thing any would-be dog owner could do is bring one into their home and find out they can’t provide the care it needs and deserves. If you’re going to get a dog, consider the ones that made our list. You can also look into the cheap small dog breeds – the Pekingese, Dachshund, etc. – that didn’t quite make the cut.

Prices will vary when determining the cheapest dogs to buy. If you need help budgeting for a four-legged friend, you can utilize our free Home Budget Calculator.