Retirement Blog

Thursday, March 29, 2012 3:56 pm
By Jennie L. Phipps · Bankrate.com

Retirement planning is much tougher for women than it is for men.

Montreal-based BMO Financial Group offers these statistics about Americans.

Women live longer than men. By age 85, there are six women for every four men. At age 100, the ratio is more than 2-to-1.
Women earn less than men, and that translates into less savings. In 2010, women earned 81 cents for every $1 men earned.
Women have more intermittent work histories. It is hard to get around the fact that women have the babies.
Widowhood or divorce reduces women’s income. The average age of widowhood is 65. In the first year after a divorce, twice as many women than men had an income below the poverty level.

» Read more
Wednesday, March 28, 2012 3:09 pm
By Jennie L. Phipps · Bankrate.com

Writer and actress Sandra Tsing Loh has an article in the March issue of The Atlantic magazine called “Daddy Issues” in which she bemoans her 91-year-old father’s longevity because, she says, hiring people to care for him is driving her to the poorhouse.

I added up the costs she mentions, and those alone were about $10,000 a month — a staggering $120,000 a year — for live-in help to look after her incontinent and self-absorbed but otherwise healthy father and her dementia-afflicted 72-year-old stepmother. Loh rages:

My family is throwing all our money away on powdering our 91-year-old dad’s giant-baby ass, leaving nothing for my sweet little daughters, with their thoughts of unicorns and poetry and dance, my helpless little daughters, who, in the end, represent me!

» Read more
Tuesday, March 27, 2012 4:55 pm
By Jennie L. Phipps · Bankrate.com

No health insurance is a problem that can wreck your retirement planning and put real retirement out of reach.

If you’ve lost your health insurance and you aren’t old enough for Medicare but you can’t buy a private pay replacement plan because you have a health problem, take a look at the federal government’s Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan website.

The Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan is a stopgap until 2014 when the Affordable Care Act really kicks in, and insurance companies will no longer be able to discriminate against potential customers with pre-existing conditions. It is administered by either your state or the federal government, if your state decided not to step up.

» Read more
Monday, March 26, 2012 5:16 pm
By Jennie L. Phipps · Bankrate.com

If you’re 65 or getting close, still working and eligible for your employer’s health insurance, you still shouldn’t ignore Medicare.

Medicare is a complex part of retirement planning, says Adrienne Muralidharan, senior Medicare specialist for Allsup, a company that offers help in choosing the best Medicare plan. “A lot of people are completely bewildered by the whole thing,” she says.

Here’s her advice for people who are 65 but still working and not yet enjoying retirement:

If you are eligible for Medicare and working for an employer that offers health insurance and has more than 20 employees, generally, the company can’t legally dump you off its policy.

» Read more
Sunday, March 25, 2012 6:00 am
By Jennie L. Phipps · Bankrate.com

If you haven’t considered long-term care during the latter stages of retirement, now’s the time, says Sean Kell, CEO of A Place for Mom, the country’s largest senior-living referral service.

Kell says his organization works daily with the families of people in need of care who scramble to find a solution and are shocked by its price tag. The cost for caring for someone with Alzheimer’s is especially high.

Dealing with the realization that they can’t afford the kind of care they want for their parents — or for themselves — is hard to do, Kell says, especially when people are forced to accept an option they feel isn’t suitable.

» Read more
Thursday, March 22, 2012 5:15 pm
By Jennie L. Phipps · Bankrate.com

Most people’s retirement planning doesn’t include sharing a home with their children, but in the last few years, faced with an economic downturn, the number of households where junior has commandeered the couch has increased dramatically.

According to an analysis of U.S. Census data by the Pew Trust, 21.6 percent of people ages 25 to 34 are living in multigenerational households. That’s up from 15.8 percent in 2000.

A follow-up survey of these boomerangers indicated that life on mom’s couch isn’t so bad. Some 78 percent say they are satisfied with their living arrangements, and 77 percent are optimistic about their future finances.

» Read more
Wednesday, March 21, 2012 2:30 pm
By Jennie L. Phipps · Bankrate.com

Our friends own a very attractive waterfront home they bought 20 years ago in a Florida beach community. They are now in their 80s, and they’d like to move closer to family, where they believe their retirement will be more comfortable. They could sell the property tomorrow if they priced it competitively — still more than they paid — but they are very reluctant to do that because the market price is much less than they are convinced their home is worth.

When the bottom fell out of the real estate market in 2008, many people thought it would recover, and prices would rise quickly.

» Read more
Tuesday, March 20, 2012 12:14 pm
By Jennie L. Phipps · Bankrate.com

Is it a mistake to allow people to claim Social Security at 62 — even at a reduced rate — when we are living longer than we did when the program first started?

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College examined this question and came to the surprising conclusion that the actuarial assumptions made in 1960, reducing the amount of people who claimed at 62, are still a fairly accurate reflection of the cost — even though we’re living 20 years longer.

I think this retirement planning math is interesting and argues strongly for the long-term stability of the Social Security program.

» Read more
Monday, March 19, 2012 2:25 pm
By Jennie L. Phipps · Bankrate.com

Reverse mortgages used to be something elderly widows considered when they were desperate to pay the bills in their waning years. Today — for better or worse — these complex loans are becoming a key factor in many people’s retirement planning.

The demographics of reverse mortgage borrowers have changed significantly in the last decade. The average age of borrowers in 2003 was 74. By 2009, the average age had dropped to 63. Of the homeowners who went through the Home Equity Conversion Mortgages, or HECM, counseling program in the fall of 2010, 46 percent were younger than 70, and 21 percent were leading-edge baby boomers ages 62 to 64.

» Read more
Sunday, March 18, 2012 6:00 am
By Jennie L. Phipps · Bankrate.com

Last week, the Dow Jones industrial average closed above 13,000 — its highest point since December 2007. This looks like good retirement planning news for those of us who are trying to figure out how best to finance our retirements with income from investments.

In light of last week’s news, Black Rock, the largest asset-management company in the U.S., offered these five suggestions for maximizing retirement income.

Expand your investment horizons. According to a United Nations population survey, a 65-year-old couple in the U.S. has a 50 percent chance that one of them will live to age 92 and a 25 percent chance that one of them will reach age 97.

» Read more
Page 73 of 128« First...102030...7172737475...8090100...Last »