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Risky driving shortens life span?

By Tara Baukus Mello · Bankrate.com
Wednesday, July 11, 2012
Posted: 6 am ET

Drivers who take risks behind the wheel of their cars, especially those that result in a violation on their driving record, have shorter life spans, according to a new studying by LexisNexis and RGA Insurance Company.

The Motor Vehicle Record, or MVR, Mortality Study found that the same driving records that are often used to calculate car insurance rates can also be used to predict a person's life span. The study, which analyzed 7.4 million records, found that the more violations on a person's MVR, the higher the likelihood they would die in general -- not just in a car. People with between two and five violations had a 24 percent higher mortality ratio, and those with six or more violations had a 79 percent higher mortality ratio. The trends were consistent throughout all age groups.

Even one major violation, such as an alcohol-related violation or excessive speeding, increases the mortality by 51 percent, compared to the same individual without the violation.

Tara Baukus Mello writes the cars blog as well as the weekly Driving for Dollars column, providing both practical financial advice for consumers as well as insight into the latest developments in the automotive world. Follow her on Facebook here or on Twitter @SheDrives.

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