Personal Finance Advice and Commentary

Thursday, October 06, 2016 3:28 pm
By Jim Wang · Bankrate.com

In 1969, the Treasury Department and the Fed discontinued $500, $1000, $5000, $10000 and $100,000 bills (that bill above is real) because no one used them anymore though a new bill hadn’t been printed since 1945. The bills are all legitimate legal tender and still in circulation (except the $100,000, which was only used in

Tags: currency
Thursday, October 06, 2016 3:22 pm
By Jim Wang · Bankrate.com

Whenever a company offers its services, it’s generally quick to note that it’s bonded, licensed, and insured (when it applies and if they are) but I was never certain what that actually meant. Until now, all I knew is that you should only hire someone if they’re bonded, licensed (if applicable) and insured. Often times

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Thursday, October 06, 2016 3:21 pm
By Jim Wang · Bankrate.com

There are advantages to going to the warehouse-club giant next time you need tires.

Tags: costco, tires
Thursday, June 09, 2011 1:12 pm
By Jim Wang · Bankrate.com

The first “bank” account I ever opened was at a credit union. I was only 15 at the time, co-signing the document with my mother, and I didn’t know the difference between a checking account and a savings account. In fact, I was even more perplexed with the credit union terminology of share draft and share

Monday, April 11, 2011 4:28 pm
By Jim Wang · Bankrate.com

Credit cards are fantastic tools if you are responsible with credit. Whereas some people compare it to a hammer, a powerful tool when used properly, I like to think of it as a Swiss army knife. Like a Swiss army knife, there are parts of it that you will probably never use as often as

Monday, July 26, 2010 1:46 pm
By Jim Wang · Bankrate.com

Have you ever wondered why a high yield savings account at ING Direct or Ally Bank can pay interest rates that are 10 to 20 times more than your local brick and mortar? When your local bank offers 0.01 percent APY on your savings account and an online bank offers 1.5 percent APY, it seems