savings

5 ways to beat puny savings account rates

Money market funds: low risk, but not insured
Next
6 of 7
Back
Money market funds: low-risk but not insured

The deal: Offered at brokerage firms and some banks, money market mutual funds are uninsured, short-term investments in relatively low-risk securities such as U.S. Treasury bills and bank certificates of deposit.

The risk: Potential loss of principal.

While money market fund investors aim to maintain a balance that never dips below $1 per share, these funds are not FDIC-insured. The SEC's new rules for money market funds establish a greater degree of protection for your money, but falling rates can lead to money market fund losses.

The reward: Monthly dividend payouts with interest rates that are typically higher than savings accounts. Some money market funds are also tax-exempt, which leaves the IRS out of the equation.

"Historically, the average money market fund has out-yielded the average bank deposit account by over 1 percentage point," says Robert Litterst, portfolio manager of Fidelity Investments Money Market Funds.

Litterst says money market funds offer other benefits such as check-writing privileges and readily available cash via ATM access. When rates rise again, money market funds can provide a competitive alternative to other low-risk account options.

Banks, brokerages and mutual fund companies offer money market mutual funds.


 

 

advertisement

Show Bankrate's community sharing policy
          Connect with us
advertisement
CD & INVESTING NEWSLETTER

Learn the latest trends that will help grow your portfolio, plus tips on investing strategies. Delivered weekly.

Ask Dr. Don

Did Dad have a will when he died?

Dear Dr. Don, How can I find out if my father had a will before he died? His story was a bit complicated. Dad remarried after my mother died. He owned a house and his new wife also owned a house. Both sold their houses,... Read more

advertisement
Partner Center
advertisement

Connect with us