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3 ways to keep bank fees from adding up

As sluggish bank rates slow interest earnings, bank fees are worsening the woes of today's average account holder. While you may not be able to add up much interest on your savings and checking accounts, you can prevent those bank fees from subtracting from your bottom line. Here are three ways to avoid giving more of your hard-earned cash to your bank.

Move to an online home

While you may love having the bank branch around the corner, convenience costs more. Many Internet banks offer accounts without monthly fees or minimum balance requirements. Without the added cost of retail branches, they can offer enticing perks such as reimbursement for ATM charges. In addition to being more fee-friendly, these institutions typically offer some of the most competitive bank rates.

Sign up for more services

If you prefer to remain with your current bank, one of the easiest ways to reduce some of your fees is to add more account services. For example, some of the nation's biggest banks offer free checking accounts to account holders who arrange monthly direct deposits.

Inflate your balance

At some banks, low balances mean higher fees. Educate yourself on your account terms. If your bank will slap you with a monthly fee for falling below a certain monthly average, do your best to keep more money in your account to avoid unnecessary expenses. Some banks let you sign up for mobile account alerts, which you can use for notification before you cross into costly territory.

While searching for the best interest rates is important, finding a way to reduce your bank fees is equally crucial in making sure that more of your money actually stays yours.

 

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