living

Cooking up a pricey backyard barbecue

5,000 reasons to love this burger
5,000 reasons to love this burger

Those blocks of frozen generic beef that have been accumulating frost in your freezer for the past two years? Not going to cut it for this barbecue.

Fleur restaurant in Las Vegas, owned by celebrity chef Hubert Keller, has something it calls the "Fleur Burger 5000." Though it sounds like it traveled through time to be eaten, 5,000 is the number of dollars you'll be handing over to enjoy this stack of goodness. It's also a good template to follow for a tasty, albeit pricey, burger.

"Most people just want to see it's actually on the menu," says Yvonne Silva, front of house at Fleur. Twenty-eight of the 5000s have been sold, though many more patrons jump at the bargain version of $70, omitting the 1995 Chateau Petrus wine that accompanies the original.

If you'd like to reconstruct the Fleur Burger 5000 in your backyard barbecue palace, you will need to start with tracking down some Wagyu beef, which can run about $65 to $70 per pound for a good cut. Next up, truffles (average about $75), foie gras (about $70) and some brioche buns (about $10).

A distant contender in terms of price, but delicious nonetheless, is the Black Label Burger at Minetta Tavern in New York, which sells for $28. Good luck attempting this one at home, as the patty is a blend of skirt steak, brisket, chuck, short rib and rib-eye, all dry-aged for 45 days and from renowned butcher Pat LaFrieda. It's seared medium-rare with caramelized onions on brioche from Balthazar Bakery.

advertisement

Show Bankrate's community sharing policy
          Connect with us
advertisement
MORTGAGE & REAL ESTATE NEWSLETTER

Timely market news and advice for consumers ready to buy, sell or invest in real estate. Delivered weekly.

Blog

Polyana da Costa

Home prices rise at slower pace

Home price growth has slowed significantly. Should you be concerned?  ... Read more

advertisement
Partner Center
advertisement

Connect with us