debt

Debt delinquency timeline: what to expect

Stage 3: 90 days past due
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Trigger: Two months have passed since your due date and three months since the billing cycle started.

What to expect: More aggressive phone calls, emails and letters from your creditor. There's a good chance your creditor will shut down the credit card account and you won't realize it until you are denied in a store. That should prompt you to call the company and work out a solution. The creditor is most likely reporting the delinquency to the credit bureaus. At the same time, late fees and interest fees add to the total amount you owe.

Your options: There is a chance you can reactivate the account by setting up a payment plan with the creditor, says McClary. If you're facing a financial hardship, your creditor may establish a payment plan with reduced payments. Once you complete the plan, the account may be revived.


 

 

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