New Visitors Privacy Policy Sponsorship Contact Us Media
Baby Boomers Family Green Home and Auto In Critical Condition Just Starting Out Lifestyle Money
- advertisement -
Bankrate.com
News & Advice Compare Rates Calculators
Rate Alerts  |  Glossary  |  Help
Mortgage Home
Equity
Auto CDs &
Investments
Retirement Checking &
Savings
Credit
Cards
Debt
Management
College
Finance
Taxes Personal
Finance

Bankrate's 2008 Retirement Guide
Tools & Calculators
Bankrate's loaded with all the best tools to plan your retirement no matter what your lifestage.
Tools & Calculators
Asset allocation calculator


  Asset Allocation Calculator

This Financial Calculator requires SUN's Java™ Plug-in. If you see this message you will need to download SUN's Java™ Plug-in. You can also get SUN's Java™ Plug-in here: Get the Java™ Plug-in!.

For more information about this Plug-in please visit: SUN's Java™ Plug-in

Definitions
Age: Your current age. This is by far the most important aspect of asset allocation. For most people the majority of their portfolio is for their retirement. The younger you are, the less likely you need this money any time soon. This allows you to invest more aggressively in stocks that generally have the best long term returns. As you get older, it is advisable to move more of your investments to securities with less fluctuation such as cash and bonds. This can help insure the money is available when you need it.
Current assets: This is the total value of your investment portfolio. Our asset allocator increases your stock exposure as your portfolio increases. Generally speaking, larger portfolios are less likely to leave individuals cash poor in a market downturn. This allows people with large portfolios to invest a bit more aggressively.
Savings per year: This is the amount you will be adding to your investments each year. Like portfolio size, the more you invest the more aggressive your investments should be.
Income required: This is the percentage of income you will need from your investments. Most people do not require any income from their investments until they retire.
Marginal tax rate: The tax rate you expect to pay on your investments.
Risk tolerance: Your personal ability to tolerate your portfolio value fluctuating up and down. Many people overestimate their ability to tolerate risk. Unless you can handle a 20% decline in your portfolio during a stock market correction, you may wish to keep your risk tolerance at or below the mid-point.
Economic outlook: This is your view of future economic growth and the overall health of the economy. The better your outlook, the more aggressive you can be with your investments.

Information and interactive calculators are made available to you as self-help tools for your independent use and are not intended to provide investment advice. We can not and do not guarantee their applicability or accuracy in regard to your individual circumstances. All examples are hypothetical and are for illustrative purposes. We encourage you to seek personalized advice from qualified professionals regarding all personal finance issues.

-- Posted: Nov. 10, 2008
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
- advertisement -
FINANCIAL LITERACY
Rev up your portfolio
with these tips and tricks.
- advertisement -
- advertisement -

About Bankrate | Privacy Policy/Your California Privacy Rights | Online Media Kit | Partnerships | Investor Relations | Press Room | Contact Us | Sitemap
NYSE: RATE | RSS Feeds |

* Mortgage rate may include points. See rate tables for details. Click here.
* To see the definition of overnight averages click here.

Bankrate.com ®, Copyright © 2014 Bankrate, Inc., All Rights Reserved, Terms of Use.