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Tax advantages of cash-out refinancing

Dear Tax Talk:
What are the tax implications of getting cash out when refinancing?
Thanks!
Tim

Dear Tim:
Cashing out of your main home is a great tax strategy if you're using the proceeds to pay off other debt on which the interest is not deductible.

An individual is allowed to take out up to $100,000 from their principal residence in addition to the original debt used to buy the home, and deduct the interest charged before it is repaid.


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This strategy is a winner since it allows the homeowner to possibly refinance other debt that may be at a higher interest rate than rates available on a second mortgage. This strategy also allows the homeowner to receive a tax benefit by deducting the interest on the loan, which in effect let's the government pick up part of the tab on the loan repayment, and lastly, it allows the homeowner to remain in his current home, which he may feel he would have to otherwise sell to cash out.

-- Posted: Jan. 9, 2003

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