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Big money?

Dear Dr. Don,
After the $100 bill, what are the next two higher denominations?
Thanks for your help,
Sue Sawbuck

Dear Sue,
The U.S. Treasury Web site states that the $100 bill has been the largest denomination of currency in circulation since 1969.

That means that currency in denominations above $100 is not available from the Department of the Treasury, the Federal Reserve System or the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

On July 14, 1969, the Department of the Treasury and the Federal Reserve System announced that currency notes in denominations of $500, $1,000, $5,000, and $10,000 would be discontinued immediately due to lack of use.

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Although these bills were issued until 1969, they were last printed in 1945. After 1969, these higher denomination notes were retired when turned in to the Federal Reserve.

The higher denomination notes are still legal tender and could theoretically be in general circulation, but by now most have found their way into the hands of private numismatic dealers and collectors.

If you are interested in purchasing these larger denominations, you should get a basic understanding of the market for these notes from collectors or dealers before buying.

-- Posted: Dec. 30, 2002

Read more Dr. Don columns
See Also
PLUS: Pictures of $500, $1,000, $5,000 and $10,000 bills
Rainbow-colored cash coming in 2003
Weird money facts
Financial advice glossary
More Dr. Don stories

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