- advertisement -
 

Tax news you can use

 

Tax laws keep changing, but don't be the last to know about them. Here's the latest filing scoop.

TAX TIP #69
IRS rules for early IRA withdrawals

You've been saving diligently for your retirement, but now you need some of that cash to cover today's expenses. Can you get to it without incurring Uncle Sam's tax wrath? In some instances, the answer is yes.

In this tax tip:
 
 
 

When you take money out of an individual retirement account before you reach age 59½, the Internal Revenue Service considers these premature distributions. In addition to owing any tax that might be due on the money, you'll face a 10 percent penalty charge on the amount.

But there are times when the IRS says it's OK to use your retirement savings early.

Two popular, penalty-free withdrawal circumstances are when you use IRA money to pay higher-education expenses or to help purchase your first home.

OK for school
When it comes to school costs, the IRS says no penalty will be assessed as long as your IRA money goes toward qualified schooling costs for yourself, your spouse or your children or grandkids.

You must make sure the eligible student attends an IRS-approved institution. This is any college, university, vocational school or other post-secondary facility that meets federal student aid program requirements. The school can be public, private or nonprofit as long as it is accredited.

Once enrolled, you can use retirement money to pay tuition and fees and buy books, supplies and other required equipment. Expenses for special-needs students also count. And if the student is enrolled at least half-time, room and board also meet IRS expense muster.

First-home exemption
Then there's your home. Uncle Sam offers various tax breaks to homeowners. He'll even bend the IRA rules a bit to help you get into your house in the first place.

You can use up to $10,000 in IRA funds toward the purchase of your first home. If you're married, and you and your spouse are both first-time buyers, you each can pull from retirement accounts, giving you $20,000 in residential cash.

Even better is the IRS definition of first-time home buyer. Technically, you don't have to be purchasing your very first abode. You qualify under the tax rules as long as you (or your spouse) didn't own a principal residence at any time during the previous two years. In fact, you can even share your IRA wealth. The IRS says the first-time home buyer using your IRA funds for a down payment can be you, your spouse, one of your children, a grandchild or a parent.

Be careful not to take out your money too soon. You must use the IRA funds within 120 days of withdrawal to pay qualified acquisition costs. This includes the costs of buying, building or rebuilding a home, along with any usual settlement, financing or closing costs.

Different treatment for Roths
These home-buying IRA options apply to traditional retirement accounts. The rules are a bit different if your nest egg is in a Roth IRA.

The $10,000 you take out for your first home is a qualified distribution as long as you've had your Roth account for five years. This means you can take out your retirement money without penalty, and because Roth earnings are tax-free, you'll have no IRS bill either.

 
Page | 1 | 2 |




TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mortgage calculator
See your FICO Score Range -- Free
How much money can you save in your 401(k) plan?
Which is better -- a rebate or special dealer financing?
VIEW MORE CALCULATORS
FINANCIAL LITERACY
Rev up your portfolio
with these tips and tricks.
- advertisement -